Special Issue "New Frontiers in Reef Coral Biotechnology"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 2043

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chiahsin Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. National Museum of Marine Biology & Aquarium, Pingtung 944, Taiwan
2. Institute of Marine Biology, National Dong Hwa University, Pingtung 944, Taiwan
Interests: cryobiology; coral cryopreservation; molecular biology; cryo-banking; genetics conservation
Dr. Sujune Tsai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Post Modern Agriculture, Mingdao University, Peetow, Chang Hua 369, Taiwan
Interests: coral biotechnology; coral reefs; cell culture; stell cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Given the significant threats against coral reef ecosystems across the globe, there is an urgent need for science-based, solution-driven projects aimed at fostering the resilience of environmentally sensitive coral reef inhabitants in the Anthropocene. In this Special Issue of Applied Sciences on reef coral biotechnology, we welcome articles centered on the development and/or validation of tools to be used to 1) mitigate environmental issues plaguing coral reefs, 2) characterize marine invertebrate health and stress load, and/or 3) biopreserve reef corals (in situ or ex situ).

As an example of a recent article whose scope and theme match those of this Special Issue, Huang et al. (2020; Scientific Reports) experimentally optimized the culture conditions for the model reef coral Pocillopora acuta; these findings will not only aid ex situ coral husbandry but will also have implications for reef restoration. As such, both basic science articles whose findings have implications for applied reef coral science in the context of conservation and those directly testing a potential reef health or management solution with the use of a novel application will be considered.

Given the global threats towards coral reefs, the central theme of this conference "International Symposium on New Frontiers in Coral Reef Biotechnology" is particularly timely. Our goal is to promote communication and dialogue in this field among marine researchers within and outside of Taiwan, and we have invited experts in the fields of coral reef ecology, physiology, conservation, and biotechnology to discuss their recent findings with a cadre of both local and foreign scientists, as well as students in these scientific areas.

Prof. Dr. Chiahsin Lin
Dr. Sujune Tsai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coral biotechnology
  • genetic conservation
  • reef restoration
  • coral husbandry and farming
  • cryopreservation
  • ocean monitoring
  • endosymbiosis
  • deep-sea corals

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Communication
Water-Insoluble Black Pigment Released from the Octocoral Sinularia flexibilis
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(16), 8012; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12168012 - 10 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Coral reefs are the most diverse and productive marine ecosystems on earth. The National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium has cultured more than 35 species of corals for research. When we conducted the asexual propagation of corals, the octocoral Sinularia flexibilis released [...] Read more.
Coral reefs are the most diverse and productive marine ecosystems on earth. The National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium has cultured more than 35 species of corals for research. When we conducted the asexual propagation of corals, the octocoral Sinularia flexibilis released a black pigment that stained the operator’s hands black. This is the first reported case of the skin being dyed black while propagating corals. We quantified the blackness of the stain by using the RGB value of the color. The longer the coral contacted the skin, the darker the skin became. Incubating the tentacles of S. flexibilis in high-salinity filtered seawater increased the amount of the black pigment released. However, collecting 100% of the black pigment was exceedingly challenging because it was very sticky and was constantly entangled with Symbiodiniaceae. Furthermore, we were unable to identify any solvents that could dissolve the pigment. The structure and function of the black pigment merit further study as it has the potential to become a new black dye for human industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Reef Coral Biotechnology)
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Article
Study on the Development and Growth of Coral Larvae
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 5255; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12105255 - 23 May 2022
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Abstract
Studies on the early development of corals are required for academic research on coral reefs and applied reef conservation, but the interval between observations is usually weeks or months. Thus, no study has comprehensively explored the development of coral larvae after settlement. This [...] Read more.
Studies on the early development of corals are required for academic research on coral reefs and applied reef conservation, but the interval between observations is usually weeks or months. Thus, no study has comprehensively explored the development of coral larvae after settlement. This study observed Galaxea fascicularis, Mycedium elephantotus, Pocillopora verrucosa, and Seriatopora caliendrum larvae after settlement, including their growth process and the formation of tentacles, skeletons, and polyps. The G. fascicularis and M. elephantotus polyps exhibited the skeleton-over-polyp mechanism, whereas the P. verrucosa and S. caliendrum polyps exhibited the polyp-over-skeleton mechanism. During asexual reproduction, the Symbiodiniaceae species clustered on the coenosarc, resulting in polyp development and skeletal growth. M. Elephantotus was unique in that its tentacles were umbrella-shaped, and its polyp growth and Symbiodiniaceae species performance during asexual reproduction differed from those of the other three corals. Although both P. verrucosa and S. caliendrum have branching morphologies, their vertical development stages were dissimilar. S. caliendrum relied on the mutual pushing of individuals in the colony to extend upward, whereas P. verrucosa had a center individual that developed vertically. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for future research on coral breeding, growth, and health assessments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Reef Coral Biotechnology)
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Conference Report
International Symposium on New Frontiers in Reef Coral Biotechnology (5 May 2022, Taiwan)
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 5758; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12115758 - 06 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Given the global threats towards coral reefs, this conference’s central theme, “Reef coral biotechnology”, is particularly timely. Our goal is to promote communication and dialogue in this field among marine researchers within and outside of Taiwan, and we have invited experts in the [...] Read more.
Given the global threats towards coral reefs, this conference’s central theme, “Reef coral biotechnology”, is particularly timely. Our goal is to promote communication and dialogue in this field among marine researchers within and outside of Taiwan, and we have invited experts in the fields of coral reef ecology, physiology, conservation, and biotechnology to discuss their recent findings with a cadre of both local and foreign scientists, as well as students (undergraduate, Master’s, and Ph.D. students). We envision that these presentations will segue into discussions and collaborations that stimulate innovation in reef coral biotechnology, and particularly in the development of tools and approaches that improve the odds of conserving coral reefs and biopreserving reef corals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Reef Coral Biotechnology)
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