Special Issue "PbS Colloidal Quantum Dots and Their Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanotechnology and Applied Nanosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Colace
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Università degli studi Roma Tre, 00154 Roma, Italy
Interests: Design, fabrication and characterization of electronic and optoelectronic devices, compatible with silicon technology and relevant to sensing, optical communications and imaging. It includes the synthesis, modeling and characterization of novel materials and nanomaterials for device applications (SiGe alloys and superlattices, group IV and III-V semiconductors, colloidal quantum dots). Other research fields are gas sensors, photovoltaics and optical countermeasures in the mid-infrared

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colloidal quantum dots (CQD) are semiconductor nanocrystals that are synthesized and suspended in solution. Their typical small size produces three-dimensional quantum confinement, enabling band-gap engineering and dramatically enhancing optical emission and absorption with tunable properties by the quantum size effect. In addition, due to their solution processability, CQDs allow simple, low temperature fabrication and are compatible with a wide variety of substrates, including polymers, glass and silicon.

Thanks to their unique electronic and optical properties and their simple fabrication process, CQDs have attracted lot of interest for a wide variety of devices, including light emitting diodes, photodetectors, solar cells and transistors.

In this framework, lead sulphide (PbS) CQDs, spanning the visible and the near infrared, are the among the most advanced colloidal materials in terms of both monodispersion and reproducibility. Over the past 20 years, CQD technology has dramatically advanced from the pioneering research and significant progress has been made in terms of both theory and experiments, with several devices demonstrating performance comparable with their bulk semiconductor counterparts. However, challenges remain to achieve full control of carrier type and concentration, mobility and defect states, as well as to improve stability under operation.

The goal of this Special Issue is to attract world-leading researchers in the area of PbS colloidal quantum dots focusing on the latest advances in both material synthesis and device fabrication and applications.

Review papers, original contributions focused on material issues, new device architectures, proof-of-concept, integration and, especially, suitable and potential applications of PbS CQD-based devices are welcome.

Prof. Lorenzo Colace
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lead sulphide colloidal quantum dots (PbS CQD)
  • Synthesis
  • Optoelectronic devices
  • Electronic devices
  • Applications
  • Integration
  • Stability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Optical Properties of PbS Quantum Dots deposited on Glass Employing a Supercritical CO2 Fluid Process
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4567; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214567 - 28 Oct 2019
Abstract
We studied the temperature dependence of the emission and absorption of PbS quantum dots deposited on glass by a supercritical CO2 fluid process. The results show that the emission is ruled by different transitions than the absorption, particularly at cryogenic temperatures. We [...] Read more.
We studied the temperature dependence of the emission and absorption of PbS quantum dots deposited on glass by a supercritical CO2 fluid process. The results show that the emission is ruled by different transitions than the absorption, particularly at cryogenic temperatures. We found indications that these observations can be linked to the PbS concentration used to form the films in conjunction with the capability of the supercritical CO2 method to form dense homogeneous films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue PbS Colloidal Quantum Dots and Their Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Developments of Solar Cells from PbS Colloidal Quantum Dots
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 1743; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051743 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
PbS (lead sulfide) colloidal quantum dots consist of crystallites with diameters in the nanometer range with organic molecules on their surfaces, partly with additional metal complexes as ligands. These surface molecules are responsible for solubility and prevent aggregation, but the interface between semiconductor [...] Read more.
PbS (lead sulfide) colloidal quantum dots consist of crystallites with diameters in the nanometer range with organic molecules on their surfaces, partly with additional metal complexes as ligands. These surface molecules are responsible for solubility and prevent aggregation, but the interface between semiconductor quantum dots and ligands also influences the electronic structure. PbS quantum dots are especially interesting for optoelectronic applications and spectroscopic techniques, including photoluminescence, photodiodes and solar cells. Here we concentrate on the latter, giving an overview of the optical properties of solar cells prepared with PbS colloidal quantum dots, produced by different methods and combined with diverse other materials, to reach high efficiencies and fill factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue PbS Colloidal Quantum Dots and Their Applications)
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