Special Issue "Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jung Yoon Seo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Climate Technology Strategy Team, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 34129, Korea
Interests: microalgae biorefinery; microalgal-based biofuels; microalgal-based bioproducts; microalgal-derived materials; bioenergy strategy; climate technology policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the global climate change crisis becomes serious, the importance of climate technologies to reduce CO2 emissions is growing exponentially. Bioenergy, one of these aforementioned climate technologies, is a carbon-neutral energy source that can reduce reliance on fossil fuels in various fields such as fuels, electricity, heat, chemicals ,and products. Microalgae biomass is the promoting candidate for application to production of biofuels and bioproducts owing to the inherent properties of high growth rates, useful components, non-edible oil crop, carbon neutrality, easy environmental adaptability, and a wide applicability for end-products.

In this context, many studies have been performed on the development of cost-competitive microalgal-based biofuels and bioproducts. Notwithstanding the extensive efforts devoted to the commercialization of those, the related existing technologies still leave much to be desired. For instance, there are complicated and less mature downstream processes and lower cost competitiveness compared to other promising renewable or conventional alternatives. The aim of this Special Issue is therefore to discuss various approaches that contribute to increase technology maturity and cost competitiveness of algal biomass, biofuels, and bioproducts. The topics of interest for this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  • Innovative microalgae biorefinery;
  • Promising downstream processing of microalgal biomass;
  • Conventional application fields of algal biomass (biofuels, biochemical, bioproducts);
  • New emerging application fields (microalgal-derived materials (ex. electrode materials, catalysts));
  • Strategic and policy support plan for algal-based bioenergy.
Dr. Jung Yoon Seo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • microalgae
  • microalgae biorefinery
  • microalgal-based biofuels
  • microalgal-based bioproducts
  • microalgal-derived materials
  • bioenergy strategy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Searching for Appropriate Storage Conditions for Short-Term Wet Preservation of Porphyridium purpureum
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(23), 8315; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238315 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 576
Abstract
It is often impossible in practice to process micro-algae immediately after their cultivation and harvest. This study, therefore, aimed to identify appropriate storage conditions for the wet preservation of Porphyridium purpureum. Algae were stored either as a concentrate or as a dilute [...] Read more.
It is often impossible in practice to process micro-algae immediately after their cultivation and harvest. This study, therefore, aimed to identify appropriate storage conditions for the wet preservation of Porphyridium purpureum. Algae were stored either as a concentrate or as a dilute culture at 4 °C, 8 °C, or 20 °C for 14 days and their quality was monitored. Concentrate storage tended to result in higher microbial numbers than dilute culture storage and clearly led to higher concentrations of malodorous organic acids. Butyric and isovaleric acid concentrations were about two orders of magnitude larger than their odor threshold values after 14 days of concentrate storage at 20 °C. Average B-phycoeryhrin (B-PE) levels were slightly higher after concentrate storage (2.5 ± 0.2 g B-PE/100 g organic matter) than after dilute culture storage (2.2 ± 0.5 g B-PE/100 g organic matter), probably due to respiration losses of other organic compounds in the first case. Significant amounts of organic matter got lost during concentrate storage (4–35%) as a result of carbohydrate degradation. The main restriction of concentrate storage was the rapid viscosity increase and formation of a weak gel structure complicating the later processing of the concentrates. These findings are highly relevant for P. purpureum cultivators and processors who have to store Porphyridium suspensions, even on a term of one day or less. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts)
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Article
Use of Biofuel Industry Wastes as Alternative Nutrient Sources for DHA-Yielding Schizochytrium limacinum Production
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 4398; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124398 - 26 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1167
Abstract
The simultaneous use of crude glycerol and effluent from anaerobic digestate, both wastes derived from the biofuel industry, were tested in the frame of circular economy concept, as potential low-cost nutrient sources for the cultivation of rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) oil microalgae [...] Read more.
The simultaneous use of crude glycerol and effluent from anaerobic digestate, both wastes derived from the biofuel industry, were tested in the frame of circular economy concept, as potential low-cost nutrient sources for the cultivation of rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) oil microalgae strain Schizochytrium limacinum SR21. Initially, the optimal carbon and nitrogen concentration levels for high S. limacinum biomass and lipids production were determined, in a culture media containing conventional, high cost, organic nitrogen sources (yeast extract and peptone), micronutrients and crude glycerol at varying concentrations. Then, the effect of a culture media composed of crude glycerol (as carbon source) and effluent digestate at varying proportions on biomass productivity, lipid accumulation, proximate composition, carbon assimilation and fatty acid content were determined. It was shown that the biomass and total lipid content increased considerably with varying effluent concentrations reaching 49.2 g L−1 at 48% (v/v) of effluent concentration, while the lipid yield at the same effluent concentration reached 10.15 g L−1, compared to 17.0 g L−1 dry biomass and 10.2 g L−1 lipid yield when yeast extract and peptone medium with micronutrients was used. Compared to the control treatment, the above production was obtained with 48% less inorganic salts, which are needed for the preparation of the artificial sea water. It was shown that Schizochytrium limacinum SR21 was able to remediate 40% of the total organic carbon content of the biofuel wastes, while DHA productivity remained at low levels with saturated fatty acids comprising the main fraction of total fatty acid content. The results of the present study suggest that the simultaneous use of two waste streams from the biofuel industry can serve as potential nutrient sources for the growth of Schizochytrium limacinum SR21, replacing the high cost organic nutrients and up to one half the required artificial sea water salts, but upregulation of DHA productivity through optimization of the abiotic environment is necessary for industrial application, including aqua feed production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts)
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