Special Issue "State-of-the-art Specialty Optical Fibers: From Fabrication, Applications to Prospects"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Valerio Romano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute for Applied Laser, Photonics and Surface Technologies (ALPS), Bern University of Applied Sciences, Pestalozzistrasse 20, 3400 Burgdorf, Switzerland
2. Institute of Applied Physics (IAP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
Interests: novel materials for optical fibers; fiber lasers; powder methods for the production of optical fibers; special optical fibers
Dr. Manuel Ryser
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Co-Head of Fiber and Fiber Lasers Laboratory, Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: fiber lasers; fiber optic sensing; fabrication of specialty optical fibers
Dr. Sönke Pilz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Postdoctoral Research Associate of Applied Fiber Technology (AFT) Research Group, Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Surface Technologies (ALPS), Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: fabrication of specialty optical fibers; optical fiber production based on powders/granulated silica method; optical fiber production based sol-gel method; novel materials and wavelength for specialty optical fibers; novel fiber light sources; fiber lasers & amplifiers; fiber optics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The topic of specialty optical fibers has enabled the development of a vast research area in the field of photonics that ranges from sensing over light shaping and delivery to special light sources. This research has been enabled by the extension of the optical fiber concept from a simple cylindrical waveguide with a core and cladding region of extremely pure undoped and doped silica glass to a tiny, eventually microstructured device that can be made from a large number of materials and material combinations.

Indeed, the success of optical fibers started with communications systems as one of the key technologies of our society. The underlying production technique that allowed this marvelous journey to start was MCVD. The extremely high purity of the glass produced with that technique allowed the production of fibers that could carry light pulses and hence information over hundreds or—after the invention of the erbium fiber amplifier—thousands of kilometers. The successful MCVD method established itself as the de facto standard for fiber production. However, highest purity and lowest losses are not always needed, and relaxing these requirements opens up myriad new applications that are based on new fiber materials and their combinations, as well as on microstructured fibers. To that end, novel production techniques and methods have been developed. Pre-fabricated elements such as capillaries and tubes allow the production of microstructured fibers by the stack-and-draw method; powder-based techniques allow many materials to be mixed and the production of active or passive fibers or fiber elements by the powder-in-tube technique or by sintering and vitrification techniques; the direct deposition of nanoparticles allows active fibers to be built with excellent control of the dopants; coating techniques like sol–gel allow the active fiber cores to be homogeneously doped at high dopant concentrations.

The present Special Issue will comprise a collection of articles reporting recent results on specialty fibers that show the state of the art with respect to functionality, performance, losses, and perspectives in the field of specialty optical fiber production.

Prof. Dr. Valerio Romano
Dr. Manuel Ryser
Dr. Sönke Pilz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Specialty optical fibers
  • Powder in tube technique
  • Fiber drawing
  • Low melting fiber materials
  • Photonic fiber materials
  • Multi component fibers
  • Specialty fiber preforms
  • Microstructured optical fibers
  • Photonic crystal fibers
  • Sol–gel fiber production
  • Active fibers
  • Novel fiber light sources

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
“Shutdown” of the Proton Exchange Channel Waveguide in the Phase Modulator under the Influence of the Pyroelectric Effect
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4585; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214585 - 28 Oct 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1445
Abstract
It is shown that the termination of the channeling of the fundamental radiation mode in the waveguide can be observed upon heating of an optical integrated circuit based on proton exchange channel waveguides formed in a lithium niobate single crystal. This process is [...] Read more.
It is shown that the termination of the channeling of the fundamental radiation mode in the waveguide can be observed upon heating of an optical integrated circuit based on proton exchange channel waveguides formed in a lithium niobate single crystal. This process is reversible, but restoration of waveguide performance takes tens of minutes. The effect of the waveguide disappearance is observed upon rapid heating (5 K/min) from a low temperature (minus 40 °C). This effect can lead to a temporary failure of navigation systems using fiber optic gyroscopes with modulators based on a lithium niobate crystal. Full article
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Article
A 20 W, Less-Than-1-kHz Linewidth Linearly Polarized All-Fiber Laser
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(12), 2593; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122593 - 12 Dec 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 988
Abstract
We report a continuous-wave high-output power and narrow-linewidth all-fiber laser at 1550 nm with the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. An all-fiber distributed feedback seed laser was boosted by three cascaded fiber amplifiers. In the experiment, we adopted a large-mode-area (LMA) Er [...] Read more.
We report a continuous-wave high-output power and narrow-linewidth all-fiber laser at 1550 nm with the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. An all-fiber distributed feedback seed laser was boosted by three cascaded fiber amplifiers. In the experiment, we adopted a large-mode-area (LMA) Er3+:Yb3+-co-doped polarization-maintaining fiber to increase nonlinear thresholds and avoided the broadening of the laser linewidth. A linear-polarization fiber laser with average output power of 20 W, linewidth of 0.88 kHz, and power jitter less than 2% was finally achieved. Full article
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