Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in Environmental Engineering: Methods and Applications

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 2563

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Water Engineering, School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU), Liverpool, UK
Interests: numerical and mathematical modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport; numerical modeling of two-phase flows in mini and micro-channels with heat and mass transfer; numerical modeling of two-phase flows in porous media; numerical modelling of droplet impact/absorption phenomena; numerical investigation of phase-change heat transfer (boiling/condensation); development, validation and application of numerical methods for the simulation of multi-phase and particulate flows

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture (DICAr) and Reseach Centre on Water (CRA), University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: development and application of numerical models for the analysis of multi-phase non-Newtonian flows with interaction phenomena; fast landslides; impulsive waves; wind waves; filtration in porous media; floating bodies; free-surface flows; sediment transport; waste-water treatment reactors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a powerful tool for simulating and analysing fluid flows in environmental engineering applications. CFD has the potential to provide accurate and reliable predictions of complex fluid flow patterns, including those occurring in environmental systems. The present Special Issue aims to showcase the latest research and developments in CFD methods and their problem-solving applications in Environmental Engineering.

The scope of the Special Issue will include, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Modeling of environmental fluid flows, including air, water, and soil.
  • Simulation of turbulent flows in environmental systems.
  • CFD applications in wastewater treatment and management.
  • CFD analysis of air pollution dispersion in urban environments.
  • Simulation of sediment transport and erosion in rivers and coastal areas.
  • CFD-based design of hydraulic structures, such as dams and reservoirs.
  • Optimization of environmental engineering systems using CFD.
  • Development of new CFD methods and algorithms for environmental applications.
  • Validation and verification of CFD simulations in Environmental and Water Engineering.
  • Uncertainty quantification of stochastic modelling parameters in CFD.

Dr. Manolia Andredaki
Dr. Sauro Manenti
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 2921 KiB  
Article
Large-Scale Cluster Parallel Strategy for Regularized Lattice Boltzmann Method with Sub-Grid Scale Model in Large Eddy Simulation
by Zhixiang Liu, Yuanji Chen, Wenjun Xiao, Wei Song and Yu Li
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(19), 11078; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131911078 - 8 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 891
Abstract
As an improved method of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), the regularized lattice Boltzmann method (RLBM) has been widely used to simulate fluid flow. For solving high Reynolds number problems, large eddy simulation (LES) and RLBM can be combined. The computation of fluid [...] Read more.
As an improved method of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), the regularized lattice Boltzmann method (RLBM) has been widely used to simulate fluid flow. For solving high Reynolds number problems, large eddy simulation (LES) and RLBM can be combined. The computation of fluid flow problems often requires a large number of computational grids and large-scale parallel clusters. Therefore, the high scalability parallel algorithm of RLBM with LES on a large-scale cluster has been proposed in this paper. The proposed parallel algorithm can solve complex flow problems with large-scale Cartesian grids and high Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve computational load balancing, the domain decomposition method (DDM) has been used in large-scale mesh generation. Three mesh generation strategies are adopted, namely 1D, 2D and 3D. Then, the buffer on the grid interface is introduced and the corresponding 1D, 2D and 3D parallel data exchange strategies are proposed. For the 3D lid-driven cavity flow and incompressible flow around a sphere under a high Reynolds number, the given parallel algorithm is analyzed in detail. Experimental results show that the proposed parallel algorithm has a high scalability and accuracy on hundreds of thousands of cores. Full article
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20 pages, 55393 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Building Air Quality in Respect of Eight Different Urban Block Designs Based on CFD Simulations
by Ana Perišić, Marko Lazić and Ines Perišić
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7408; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137408 - 22 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 972
Abstract
Different urban block morphologies can greatly influence the air quality inside the buildings of the block. The model presented in this paper determines the correlation between block morphology and air quality, and outputs the indoor air quality via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. [...] Read more.
Different urban block morphologies can greatly influence the air quality inside the buildings of the block. The model presented in this paper determines the correlation between block morphology and air quality, and outputs the indoor air quality via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. In this study, stagnant air was assumed to have a velocity lower than 0.15 m/s and considered to be low-quality air in the context of human health. The geometry of the urban blocks was simplified based on real-life buildings. Doors and windows were not 3D-modeled, and all the vertical surfaces of the buildings were considered as potential locations for them. Eight of the highest-frequency wind directions out of sixteen main directions per block were used. Wind directions and velocities were determined based on the weather data for one location chosen for testing. The simulation used the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations with the k-ε turbulence model. The results were then interpreted through the specific algorithm using 3D graphic software. The surface of the building envelope was divided into smaller meshes. For each mesh, the average velocity was calculated and meshes were marked for values below the stagnant air threshold. The eight results, one from each wind direction, were synthesized into one final result. The model was tested on eight different urban block morphologies based on real-life blocks, i.e., blocks in Novi Sad, Serbia. The pressure on the building surfaces determined via CFD analyses is presented alongside results from the method described in this paper. The results show that urban block morphologies with clustered buildings inside the urban block, which are typical for the most newly built structures in Novi Sad, have areas on the facades where windows cannot provide elemental natural ventilation throughout the year. To interpret the results obtained in this research, graphs and 3D color-coding models were used. The best results show a 1-tower urban block morphology with only 0.7% of all vertical faces of the model registering a wind velocity lower than the set minimum. The worst results were measured for a traditional urban block typical in old city centers. A total of 54.5% of all the vertical surfaces show no problems with air stagnation in close proximity to them. Full article
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