Special Issue "Advances in Food Flavor Analysis"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alessandro Genovese
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici, NA, Italy
Interests: volatile compounds analysis; in vivo and in vitro aroma release; wine aroma; olive oil aroma; coffee aroma; sensory analysis
Dr. Nicola Caporaso
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Food Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, United Kingdom
Interests: food quality; raw material characterisation; food aroma; rapid nondestructive food analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to contribute to a Special Issue of the journal Applied Sciences, “Advances in food flavor analysis”, which aims to present recent developments in the field of food science. Food flavor is an important key factor in consumer acceptability. It depends on the combined responses of olfaction, taste, and the somatosenses, and the cognitive processing in the brain of these inputs. Flavor release most commonly refers to the release of flavor components from food during eating. Volatile compounds released from food can interact in several ways with the human olfactory system, either orthonasally or retronasally, causing some changes in odor perception. Nonvolatile chemical stimuli are dissolved in the mouth, reaching several types of sensory receptors on the tongue, producing sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and umami taste. Another type of sensation, named somatosensation, occurs through the trigeminal nerve stimulation in the mouth, giving rise to pungency, astringency, metallic irritation, and thermal attributes. Flavor release is influenced by numerous factors, including chemical interactions between the food and the flavoring, physical barriers, as well as human factors. Research in this area can help the food industry to improve food quality as well as to develop new functional foods that are healthier and with improved flavor.

You are thus invited to submit your original research papers, mini-reviews, and perspective articles that include but are not limited to the volatile and nonvolatile flavor compounds of foods (including all aspects of the production chain which affect their production), the modality of the release of aroma compounds during and after eating, as well as consumer perception.

Dr. Alessandro Genovese
Dr. Nicola Caporaso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Volatile compounds analysis; Odor active compounds;Aroma release
  • Food oral processing
  • Saliva effect
  • Food matrix effect
  • Food processing
  • Oxidation
  • Fermentation
  • Antioxidant
  • Food quality
  • Food control
  • Solid phase microextraction
  • Gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry
  • Gas-chromatography/olfactometry
  • Retronasal aroma simulator
  • Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry
  • In vivo analysis
  • Sensory analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Key Aroma Compounds in Two Bavarian Gins
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7269; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207269 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
The characteristic, dominant flavor of gin is juniper, often within a complex aroma of other botanicals. The present study examined two gins from a distillery in the German state of Bavaria; one produced with 50 individual botanicals, the other with 15. The study [...] Read more.
The characteristic, dominant flavor of gin is juniper, often within a complex aroma of other botanicals. The present study examined two gins from a distillery in the German state of Bavaria; one produced with 50 individual botanicals, the other with 15. The study focused on characterizing the aroma profiles and identifying the key aroma-active compounds of the gins. Comparative sensory evaluations of the gins revealed marked differences in their aroma profiles, with the botanical-rich gin exhibiting more citrusy, orangey and fruity notes than the gin containing fewer botanicals. Instrumental analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O) using aroma extract dilution assays (AEDA) identified terpenes as the dominant key aroma compounds, specifically limonene, 1,8-cineole, linalool, estragole and trans-anethole, with additional contributions from aldehydes, such as nonanal, and phenylpropanoids, such as eugenol and estragole. Selected compounds were quantified using stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and stabile isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) with GC-MS analysis. Further, odor thresholds and corresponding odor activity values (OAVs) of these compounds were calculated, with linalool exhibiting the highest OAV in both gins. The present analyses revealed how different botanicals alter the concentrations of key aroma compound constituents and elicit a shift in the overall aroma profile of the final spirit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Food Flavor Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
The Use of a Targeted Must Oxygenation Method in the Process of Developing the Archival Potential of Natural Wine
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 4810; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144810 - 13 Jul 2020
Abstract
We examined the effect of two different technological processes for wine production on qualitative parameters of wine. We used the reductive method, which is currently considered to be the conventional method, and a targeted must oxidation method. We evaluated the basic physicochemical parameters [...] Read more.
We examined the effect of two different technological processes for wine production on qualitative parameters of wine. We used the reductive method, which is currently considered to be the conventional method, and a targeted must oxidation method. We evaluated the basic physicochemical parameters and sensory attributes of wine as well as the content of phenolic substances in wine, which are responsible for the oxidation processes. The vegetable materials used were the grape varieties, Welschriesling, Chardonnay, and Rheinriesling. The content of phenolic substances was determined by HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), and the basic analytical parameters of wine were determined by FT-IR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) spectrometry. The sensory analysis was evaluated according to the International Union of Oenologists. For each of the wines examined, the total content of phenolic substances decreased after the targeted oxidation method was applied. For the Welschriesling variety produced by the reduction method, the total content of the 19 monitored phenolic substances in the year 2015 was 88.37 mg·L−1, and for the wine produced by target oxygenation, it was 68.63 mg·L−1. This represents a decrease of 21.5%. In the year 2016, the decrease was 20.91%. By reducing the content of phenolic substances, the oxidation processes in wines are eliminated after bottling. Thus, there is less need for sulphating wines with a reduced content of phenols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Food Flavor Analysis)
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