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Advanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Ophthalmology

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2022) | Viewed by 5723

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: retinal blood flow; doppler OCT; OCT angiography; optophysiology; UHR-OCT imaging of the anterior eye; tear film

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a non-contact, high-resolution imaging modality has revolutionized ophthalmic imaging and diagnostics. Since its origins in structural visualizations based on reflectance and scattering properties of the tissue, various technological and methodological advancements have extended the possiblities of OCT to investigate dynamic processes and to reveal new morphological and functional biomarkers.

This Special Issue, entitled “Advanced Optical Coherence Tomography in Ophthalmology”, aims to highlight recent progress and developments in the field of ophthalmic imaging using OCT. It covers all aspects, including instrumentation, methodologies, image processing approaches that provide insight into the morphology, physiological processes and pathophysiological changes of the anterior and posterior eye, and has the potential to enhance both ophthalmic research and clinical applicability for the diagnosis and monitoring of various ophthalmic conditions.

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

  • OCT and high-resolution OCT;
  • Polarization-sensitive OCT;
  • Doppler OCT;
  • OCT angiography;
  • Optical coherence elastography;
  • Optophysiology;
  • OCT spectroscopy;
  • Adaptive optics OCT;
  • OCT and machine learning.

You are cordially invited to submit your original research or review papers for this Special Issue.

Dr. René Werkmeister
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-resolution OCT
  • Polarization-sensitive OCT
  • Doppler OCT
  • OCT angiography
  • Optical coherence elastography
  • Optophysiology
  • OCT spectroscopy
  • Adaptive optics OCT
  • Imaging techniques and instrumentation
  • Biomedical imaging
  • Ophthalmic imaging
  • OCT functional extensions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 6371 KiB  
Article
Clinical Observation of Choroidal Osteoma Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography
by Yi Xuan, Qing Chang, Yongjin Zhang, Xiaofeng Ye, Wei Liu, Lei Li, Keyan Wang, Jian Zhou and Min Wang
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(9), 4472; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12094472 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3381
Abstract
Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to choroidal osteoma (CO) can cause profound visual loss, but detecting CNV and the tumor’s feeder vessels using traditional fluorescent angiography imaging is challenging. Newly developed TowardPi swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and OCT angiography (SS-OCTA) enable ultra-high resolution, [...] Read more.
Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to choroidal osteoma (CO) can cause profound visual loss, but detecting CNV and the tumor’s feeder vessels using traditional fluorescent angiography imaging is challenging. Newly developed TowardPi swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and OCT angiography (SS-OCTA) enable ultra-high resolution, enhanced penetration with longer wavelength (1060 nm), a rapid scan rate (400 KHz), reduced loss of signal strength with increasing depth, and 120° angular widefield of fundus view, enabling a nearly histological description of the retina and choroid. We therefore used this SS-OCT and SS-OCTA platform to observe the intrinsic features of osteoma in 23 eyes of 21 patients. It was found that the borders of CO were clearly demarcated from the adjacent choroidal Sattler’s and Haller’s layers, while on a corresponding B-scan the blood flow of the CO was detected mainly within the choriocapillaries and partly within Sattler’s layer. The CNV was identified as numerous branching or radiating vessels connecting with intrinsic feeder vessels displaying various patterns including ginseng, instant noodle, growth ring, tangle, spider web, medusa, seafan, and irregular shape. Moreover, tumor-like tissues were found to grow above the disrupted Bruch’s membrane. SS-OCTA can be used to detect the tumor vasculature in CO. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Ophthalmology)
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10 pages, 1524 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Optical Coherence Tomography for Longitudinal Monitoring of Postnatal Retinal Development in Developing Mouse Eyes
by Guangying Ma, Jie Ding, Tae-Hoon Kim and Xincheng Yao
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 1860; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12041860 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1669
Abstract
A better study of postnatal retinal development is essential for the in-depth understanding of the nature of the vision system. To date, quantitative analysis of postnatal retinal development is primarily limited to endpoint histological examination. This study is to validate in vivo optical [...] Read more.
A better study of postnatal retinal development is essential for the in-depth understanding of the nature of the vision system. To date, quantitative analysis of postnatal retinal development is primarily limited to endpoint histological examination. This study is to validate in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) for longitudinal monitoring of postnatal retinal development in developing mouse eyes. OCT images of C57BL/6J mice were recorded from postnatal day (P) 14 to P56. Three-dimensional (3D) frame registration and super averaging were adopted to investigate the fine structure of the retina. Quantitative OCT analysis revealed distinct outer and inner retinal layer changes, corresponding to eye development. At the outer retina, external limiting membrane (ELM) and ellipsoid zone (EZ) band intensities gradually increased with aging, and the IZ band was detectable by P28. At the inner retina, a hyporeflective layer (HRL) between the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and inner plexiform layer (IPL) was observed in developing eyes and gradually disappeared with aging. Further image analysis revealed individual RGCs within the HRL layer of the young mouse retina. However, RGCs were merged with the NFL and the IPL in the aged mouse retina. Moreover, the sub-IPL layer structure was observed to be gradually enhanced with aging. To interpret the observed retinal layer kinetics, a model based on eyeball expansion, cell apoptosis, and retinal structural modification was proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Ophthalmology)
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