Recycling of Biological Materials

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 3041

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Group in Plant Production and Technology, Plant Sciences and Microbiology Department, Miguel Hernández University (UMH), 03312 Orihuela, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; waste valorization; sustainability; circular economy; production techniques; environmental management; water treatment; waste reuse

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group in Plant Production and Technology, Plant Sciences and Microbiology Department, Miguel Hernández University (UMH), 03312 Orihuela, Spain
Interests: production techniques; food crops; sustainable development; environmental management; waste management; water management; wastewater
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group in Plant Production and Technology, Plant Sciences and Microbiology Department, Miguel Hernández University, Ctra. de Beniel, km 3,2. 03312 Orihuela, Alicante, Spain
Interests: pomology; food quality; primary and secondary metabolites; antioxidant activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for a Special Issue on "Recycling of Biological Materials" in the context of sustainable development and the circular economy. In recent years, we have witnessed a growing awareness of the importance of addressing environmental challenges and promoting practices that minimize negative impacts on ecosystems. In this regard, the recycling of biological materials emerges as an essential strategy to promote resource reuse, conservation, and the transition towards a more circular economy.

This Special Issue aims to bring together original research and technical contributions that address various facets of recycling biological materials. Researchers are encouraged to submit works that explore new methodologies, technologies, and innovative approaches to the management and processing of biological materials in the context of sustainable development.

Relevant thematic areas for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Characterization and classification of recyclable biological materials.
  • Methods and techniques for collection, separation, and processing of biological materials.
  • Emerging technologies for recycling biomaterials.
  • Modeling and simulation of biological material recycling systems.
  • Life cycle assessment and environmental impact evaluation in the recycling of biological materials.
  • Process optimization and logistics in the recycling of biological materials.
  • Design and development of recyclable products and materials based on biomaterials.
  • Education and awareness strategies on recycling biological materials.
  • Policies and regulatory frameworks to promote the recycling of biological materials.

Furthermore, researchers are encouraged to submit works that address the challenges and opportunities related to the effective implementation of circular economy practices in the recycling of biological materials. This may include aspects such as:

  • Economic analysis and feasibility assessment of biological material recycling systems.
  • Social and ethical aspects of recycling biological materials.
  • Case studies and best practices in the recycling of biological materials across different industries and sectors.
  • Integration of digital technologies and information systems in biological material recycling systems.
  • Innovations in waste management and resource recovery through the recycling of biological materials.
  • Value chain analysis and collaboration among key stakeholders in the biological material recycling chain.

We look forward to receiving contributions from researchers and experts in this field, presenting original research findings, critical reviews, and innovative perspectives. Selected contributions will be published in this Special Issue, aiming to provide a platform for knowledge exchange and advancement in the field of recycling biological materials within the context of sustainable development and the circular economy.

We invite you to submit your research and contributions to this Special Issue, and we look forward to receiving high-quality papers that drive knowledge and understanding of the challenges and opportunities in recycling biological materials.

Dr. Dámaris Núñez-Gómez
Prof. Dr. Pablo Melgarejo Moreno
Prof. Dr. Pilar Legua Murcia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • recycling
  • biological materials
  • sustainable development
  • circular economy
  • resource conservation
  • waste management
  • biomaterials
  • environmental impact

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1245 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Integration of Protein-Rich Oat Waste Material into Meat Formulations
by Joanna Tkaczewska and Marzena Zając
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3445; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083445 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 604
Abstract
The objective of this study was to modify a protein-rich by-product, generated during β-glucan production, to render it appropriate for incorporation into meat products. Additionally, the study sought to assess the quality of a prototype meat product containing oat additives, depending on its [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to modify a protein-rich by-product, generated during β-glucan production, to render it appropriate for incorporation into meat products. Additionally, the study sought to assess the quality of a prototype meat product containing oat additives, depending on its concentration. Through hydrolyzation, its solubility was enhanced, making it suitable for broader applications in food products. With an average protein content of 52% and fat content of 6%, the pure hydrolysate exhibited a notable ferric ion reduction, as well as metal chelating properties. In meat formulations, the hydrolysate was integrated at concentrations of 1%, 2%, and 3%, relative to the meat mass. Following cooking and subsequent storage for 21 days, assessments were conducted every 7 days to evaluate colour retention, texture, and oxidation status. At concentrations of 2% to 3% (equivalent to 2–3 g/100 g), the hydrolysate significantly enhanced colour stability, while concurrently fostering oxidation. Notably, cohesiveness and resilience were augmented, with no discernible impact on hardness. The application of oat protein hydrolysate, particularly at 2–3 g/100 g, serves as a viable strategy for enhancing colour stability in meat formulations. However, its pro-oxidative effects necessitate supplementation with antioxidants to mitigate potential deterioration in the final product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling of Biological Materials)
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16 pages, 1799 KiB  
Article
Co-Composting of Green Waste and Dredged Sediments Can Reduce the Environmental Impact of the Potted Nursery without Affecting Plant Growth
by Francesco Paolo Nicese, Lapo Azzini, Stefano Lucchetti, Cristina Macci, Francesca Vannucchi, Grazia Masciandaro, Ottorino Luca Pantani, Paola Arfaioli, Shamina Imran Pathan, Giacomo Pietramellara and Jacopo Manzini
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041538 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 720
Abstract
The ornamental nursery industry is steadily growing in Europe, and a consequent increase in the demand for substrates related to container plant cultivations is expected in the coming years. Currently, substrates consist in part or entirely of peat, a non-renewable resource with concerns [...] Read more.
The ornamental nursery industry is steadily growing in Europe, and a consequent increase in the demand for substrates related to container plant cultivations is expected in the coming years. Currently, substrates consist in part or entirely of peat, a non-renewable resource with concerns about its environmental impact due to extraction, transport, and use. Therefore, it is essential to focus on alternative materials, particularly waste by-products to be recycled as components of substrates to achieve more sustainable cultivations. In this study, substrates obtained by mixing co-composted dredged sediments (S) and green waste (GW) in different ratios (1:3; 1:1; 3:1) were tested for cultivation, and plant growth was compared with a control growing media (peat and pumice in a 1:1 ratio). The cultivation trial lasted for one year and was carried out on two potted ornamental evergreen shrubs (Photinia × fraseri and Viburnum tinus). The results showed that the plant growth parameters of both species, occurring in substrates with co-composted materials, were not significantly affected compared to the control, with the exception of below-ground biomass in V. tinus. Moreover, a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) analysis was carried out to quantify the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) deriving from the replacement of peat with the other proposed substrates. The functional unit was 10 L (Ø 24 cm) potted plants and the results were expressed in kg of CO2 equivalent (kg CO2eq). We demonstrated that the replacement of peat-based substrates with the alternative substrates was able to reduce the GHG emission by an average of 11.56 to 23.13%. Higher GHG emissions were related to the cultivation phase (0.9 kg CO2eq/plant), and while comparing substrates, we obtained an average percentage reduction of 28.1% to 59.6%. Thus, our results suggest that co-composted mixtures of dredged sediments with green waste could be used as sustainable techno-soils for pot nursery cultivation of ornamental species with reduced environmental impact. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling of Biological Materials)
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16 pages, 2011 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Agricultural Soil-Improving Zeolite for Improving Irrigation Water Quality
by Dámaris Núñez-Gómez, Pilar Legua, Vicente Lidón, Agustín Conesa, Juan José Martínez-Nicolás and Pablo Melgarejo
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010418 - 3 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1295
Abstract
With a progressively decreasing availability of water for irrigation, the utilization of lower agronomic quality water sources is becoming more prevalent. Compounds such as sodium and boron, due to their impact on crop development and production, are gaining significance in these water sources. [...] Read more.
With a progressively decreasing availability of water for irrigation, the utilization of lower agronomic quality water sources is becoming more prevalent. Compounds such as sodium and boron, due to their impact on crop development and production, are gaining significance in these water sources. Finding novel methods to immobilize these compounds in irrigation water is a top priority in the global agricultural sector. This study focused on exploring the potential of natural zeolite, commonly used as a soil improver and as a sorbent for sodium and boron in natural agricultural waters. The zeolite exhibited favorable properties, including a surface area of 40 m2/g and a cation-exchange capacity of 1.8 mg/g. Using a central composite factorial design, the zeolite’s capacity to remove sodium and boron from irrigation water was investigated. The results demonstrated significant efficiency in boron removal, while sodium removal was limited, with occasional desorption episodes. Response surface analysis revealed optimal conditions for the removal of each cation. Additionally, adsorption kinetics and pH effects were explored, emphasizing the influence on sodium sorption. Kinetic models were applied, and the pseudo-first-order model proved suitable for describing the sorption kinetics. These findings enhance our understanding of zeolite efficacy in irrigation water purification, emphasizing the complexity of cation interactions in “complex” solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling of Biological Materials)
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