Special Issue "New Materials for Antibacterial Applications"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anita Umerska
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Interests: pharmaceutics; drug delivery; biomaterials; nanoparticles; polymers; ionic liquids; antimicrobials; antimicrobial peptides; antimicrobial susceptibility testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The worldwide occurrence of resistance to conventional antibiotics demands new strategies to either prevent or treat complicated infections. Materials have been increasingly used for medical purposes and are of great interest as an approach to either killing or reducing the activity of numerous bacteria. The antibacterial materials and coatings are also employed to prevent undesired bacterial adhesion, colonization of surfaces and biofilm formation. Recently, nanotechnology tools receive considerable interest for their antibacterial usage.

The antibacterial properties of a variety of both, organic and inorganic materials have extensively been investigated. In understanding these antibacterial properties it is important to recognize that while some materials possess antibacterial activity in their own right, the others do not have antibacterial properties by themselves but may serve as carriers/drug delivery systems for antibacterial substances. These substances include either conventional antibiotics or newly emerging alternatives to standard treatments such as antimicrobial peptides and other biomolecules.

This special issue aims to provide a platform for recent advances in the area of new materials for antibacterial applications. Various submission types, such as original research manuscripts, short communications, reviews, and case reports are welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Antibacterial materials made of either organic or inorganic substances
  • Design, development and characterization of materials for antibacterial applications; in vitro and/or in vivo evaluation of their antibacterial properties
  • Materials as delivery systems for antibacterial agents
  • Mechanisms of action of antibacterial materials
  • Interactions between bacteria and materials
  • Nanoparticulate materials for antibacterial use
  • Antimicrobial surfaces
  • Future perspective in the area of materials for antibacterial applications

Dr. Anita Umerska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibacterial materials
  • antibacterial nanoparticles
  • nanomedicine
  • nanotechnology
  • antimicrobial polymers
  • antibacterial coatings
  • bacterial adhesion
  • biofilm
  • antibiotic resistance
  • infection

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Evaluation of Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Properties of a Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Coating for the Development of Antibacterial Medical Implants
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 495; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080495 - 09 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1362
Abstract
Peri-implant infection is a serious complication in surgical procedures involving implants. We conducted an in vitro study to determine whether the use of a fluorinated diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) coating on a titanium alloy surface can prevent peri-implant infection. After applying the F-DLC, we [...] Read more.
Peri-implant infection is a serious complication in surgical procedures involving implants. We conducted an in vitro study to determine whether the use of a fluorinated diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) coating on a titanium alloy surface can prevent peri-implant infection. After applying the F-DLC, we evaluated its antibacterial and cytotoxic properties. The coating groups, containing controlled fluorine concentrations of 5.44%, 17.43%, 24.09%, and 30%, were examined for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli according to ISO 22196 for the measurement of antibacterial activity on plastics and other nonporous surfaces. Biological toxicity was evaluated using Chinese hamster V79 cells according to ISO 10993-5 for the biological evaluation of medical devices. In the control group, populations of S. aureus and E. coli substantially increased from 2.4 × 104 to (1.45 ± 1.11) × 106 colony-forming units (CFUs) and from 2.54 × 104 to (4.04 ± 0.44) × 106 CFUs, respectively. However, no bacteria colonies were detected in any F-DLC group with a fluorine concentration of ≥ 17.43%. In the biological toxicity study, an F-DLC coating with a fluorine concentration of 30% showed a colony formation rate of 105.8 ± 24.1%, which did not differ significantly from the colony formation rate of 107.5 ± 31.1% in the nontoxic control group. An F-DLC coating on titanium alloy discs showed excellent in vitro antibacterial activity with no biological toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Materials for Antibacterial Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effect of Biosynthesized ZnO Nanoparticles on Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa
Antibiotics 2020, 9(5), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9050260 - 17 May 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 1817
Abstract
Synthesis of nanoparticles using the plants has several advantages over other methods due to the environmentally friendly nature of plants. Besides being environmentally friendly, the synthesis of nanoparticles using plants or parts of the plants is also cost effective. The present study focuses [...] Read more.
Synthesis of nanoparticles using the plants has several advantages over other methods due to the environmentally friendly nature of plants. Besides being environmentally friendly, the synthesis of nanoparticles using plants or parts of the plants is also cost effective. The present study focuses on the biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using the seed extract of Butea monsoperma and their effect on to the quorum-mediated virulence factors of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at sub minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The synthesized ZnO NPs were characterized by different techniques, such as Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average size of the nanoparticles was 25 nm as analyzed by TEM. ZnO NPs at sub MIC decreased the production of virulence factors such as pyocyanin, protease and hemolysin for P. aeruginosa (p ≤ 0.05). The interaction of NPs with the P. aeruginosa cells on increasing concentration of NPs at sub MIC levels showed greater accumulation of nanoparticles inside the cells as analyzed by TEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Materials for Antibacterial Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Brief Report
Survival of Bacterial Strains on Wood (Quercus petraea) Compared to Polycarbonate, Aluminum and Stainless Steel
Antibiotics 2020, 9(11), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110804 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1920
Abstract
Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) remain a burden in healthcare facilities, environmental surfaces being a potential reservoir for healthcare-associated pathogens. In this context, exploration of materials with potential antimicrobial activities represents a way forward for the future. Here, we explored the survival of four bacterial [...] Read more.
Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) remain a burden in healthcare facilities, environmental surfaces being a potential reservoir for healthcare-associated pathogens. In this context, exploration of materials with potential antimicrobial activities represents a way forward for the future. Here, we explored the survival of four bacterial species commonly involved in HAI (Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus), on oak versus three other materials (aluminum, polycarbonate, stainless steel). Twenty microliters of each bacterial suspension (approximatively 107 bacteria) were deposited on each material. Bacterial counts were measured by grinding and culturing on day 0, 1, 2, 6, 7 and 15. Analyses were performed in triplicate for each material and each time evaluated. It appeared that the bacteria viable count decreased rapidly on transversal and tangential oak compared with the other materials for all bacterial species. Furthermore, no difference was noticed between transversal and tangential oak. These results underline the potential for use of oak materials in healthcare facilities, a consideration that should be supported by further investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Materials for Antibacterial Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop