Environmental Hotspots and Drivers of Antimicrobial Resistance

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 7670

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UCIBIO-Applied Molecular Biosciences Unit, Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biological Sciences, REQUIMTE Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto. Porto, Portugal
Interests: infectious diseases; bacterial molecular and genomic epidemiology; eco-evolution of antibiotic resistance and biocides/metal tolerance within a one health perspective (clones and mobile genetic elements)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
2. UCIBIO-Applied Molecular Biosciences Unit, Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biological Sciences, REQUIMTE Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial resistance (antibiotics and biocides/metals) and foodborne diseases; Salmonella and other Enterobacterales at the environment–animal–food–human interface; one health approach
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. TOXRUN—Toxicology Research Unit, University Institute of Health Sciences, CESPU, CRL, 4585-116 Gandra, Portugal
2. UCIBIO-Applied Molecular Biosciences Unit, Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biological Sciences, REQUIMTE Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases; molecular and genomic epidemiology of bacterial pathogens under a one health approach; forensic microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antibiotic resistance is a global menace for public health with different players within the One Health context. Multiple drivers have promoted the selection and/or spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their genes among humans, animals, and the environment by multiple transmission pathways. Among them are antibiotics, biocides, metals, and other pollutants present in different settings, as well as insufficient hygiene practices in food-animal production or healthcare units. The application of genomics and metagenomics to antibiotic resistance research has been a key strategy to decipher the main players (clones, genetic elements) involved in bacterial evolution and in the interconnection among microbiota from overlapping ecosystems contributing to this menace. However, a lot is yet to be discovered. This Special Issue of “Environmental hotspots and drivers for Antimicrobial Resistance” will highlight research findings that cover topics centering on antibiotic resistance and the diverse environmental contexts contributing to it. The following topics (among others) will be considered:

  • Environmental hotspots of antibiotic resistance;
  • Drivers of selection, persistence, and horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance (e.g. biocide and heavy metal tolerance) present in diverse environments;
  • Whole-genome and metagenomic studies on microbial populations, clones, and mobile genetic elements; associated with antimicrobial resistance (e.g., antibiotics, biocide, heavy metals) from diverse environments.
  • Antibiotic resistance evolution in environmental contexts;
  • Methodological tools and novel approaches to better detect antibiotic resistance in the environment.

This topic fits with the scope of Antibiotics within the fields of microbiology and genetics. Within the scope list presented by “Antibiotics”, manuscripts in the following topics can be submitted to this Special Issue:

  • uses of antibiotics, including on animals and in agriculture;
  • new methods for assaying and evaluating antibiotics;
  • classes of antibiotics;
  • antibiotic resistance and misuse;
  • epidemiology of antimicrobial use;
  • antimicrobial stewardship;
  • qualitative and quantitative research exploring the determinants of antimicrobial use and resistance.

Dr. Carla Novais
Dr. Patrícia Antunes
Dr. Ana R. Freitas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • antibiotics
  • biocides
  • one health
  • environment
  • clones
  • mobile genetic elements
  • genomics
  • metagenomics
  • molecular epidemiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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7 pages, 251 KiB  
Communication
KPC-Producing Enterobacterales from Douro River, Portugal—Persistent Environmental Contamination by Putative Healthcare Settings
by Josman Dantas Palmeira, Inah do Arte, Mai Muhammed Ragab Mersal, Catarina Carneiro da Mota and Helena Maria Neto Ferreira
Antibiotics 2023, 12(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12010062 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2044
Abstract
Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) are a growing concern, representing a major public health threat to humans, especially in healthcare settings. In the present study, we evaluated the persistent contamination by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in water from Douro River, Portugal. KPC-producing Enterobacterales were detected in five [...] Read more.
Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) are a growing concern, representing a major public health threat to humans, especially in healthcare settings. In the present study, we evaluated the persistent contamination by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in water from Douro River, Portugal. KPC-producing Enterobacterales were detected in five water samples separated chronologically by 15 days each. Susceptibility testing was performed by disk-diffusion-method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), phenotypic carbapenemase activity was evaluated by carbapenem inactivation method, presumptive identification of the isolates was performed by CHROMagar orientation and confirmed by API-20E. Carbapenemase genes were screened by PCR and the clonality of all isolates was assessed by XbaI-Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Fifteen KPC-producing Enterobacterales isolates were selected, identified as multidrug-resistant and showed a resistance profile to non-beta-lactam antibiotics: sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim (7/15), ciprofloxacin (3/15), fosfomycin (3/15) and chloramphenicol (2/15). Isolates were identified as (6) Escherichia coli and (9) Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our results suggest a punctual contamination with KPC-producing Enterobacterales continued through the time. The absence of clonality between the isolates suggests a circulation of mobile genetic element harbouring KPC gene in the origin of contamination. This work provides a better understanding on the impacts of water pollution resulting from human activities on aquatic environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Hotspots and Drivers of Antimicrobial Resistance)
10 pages, 322 KiB  
Article
Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli from Poultry and Wild Birds (Sparrow) in Djelfa (Algeria), with Frequent Detection of CTX-M-14 in Sparrow
by Mohamed Belmahdi, Nadia Safia Chenouf, Abdelkrim Ait Belkacem, Sandra Martinez-Alvarez, Mario Sergio Pino-Hurtado, Zahra Benkhechiba, Samiha Lahrech, Ahcène Hakem and Carmen Torres
Antibiotics 2022, 11(12), 1814; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11121814 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1959
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat that is spreading more and more in both human and animal niches. This study investigates the antimicrobial resistance and virulence threats of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from intestinal and fecal samples of 100 chickens, 60 turkeys, and [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat that is spreading more and more in both human and animal niches. This study investigates the antimicrobial resistance and virulence threats of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from intestinal and fecal samples of 100 chickens, 60 turkeys, and 30 sparrows. Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing E. coli isolates were recovered in 12 of the animals tested, selecting one isolate per positive animal: sparrow (eight isolates, 26.7%), turkey (three isolates, 5%), and chicken (one isolate, 1%). The E. coli isolates were ascribed to B1 and D phylogenetic groups. The blaCTX-M-14 gene was detected in all ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from sparrow. The blaCTX-M-15 (two isolates) and blaCTX-M-14 genes (one isolate) were detected in the isolates of turkey, and the blaCTX-M-1 gene in one isolate from broiler. Three lineages were revealed among the tested isolates (ST/phylogenetic group/type of ESBL/origin): ST117/D/CTX-M-1/broiler, ST4492 (CC405)/D/CTX-M-15/turkey, and ST602/B1/CTX-M-14/sparrow. All isolates were negative for stx1, sxt2, and eae virulence genes. Our findings provide evidence that the sparrow could be a vector in the dissemination of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates to other environments. This study also reports, to our knowledge, the first detection of blaCTX-M-14 from sparrow at a global level and in turkey in Algeria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Hotspots and Drivers of Antimicrobial Resistance)

Review

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35 pages, 3348 KiB  
Review
Unraveling the Role of Metals and Organic Acids in Bacterial Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain
by Andreia Rebelo, Agostinho Almeida, Luísa Peixe, Patrícia Antunes and Carla Novais
Antibiotics 2023, 12(9), 1474; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12091474 - 21 Sep 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2438
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has a significant impact on human, animal, and environmental health, being spread in diverse settings. Antibiotic misuse and overuse in the food chain are widely recognized as primary drivers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, other antimicrobials, such as metals and organic [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has a significant impact on human, animal, and environmental health, being spread in diverse settings. Antibiotic misuse and overuse in the food chain are widely recognized as primary drivers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, other antimicrobials, such as metals and organic acids, commonly present in agri-food environments (e.g., in feed, biocides, or as long-term pollutants), may also contribute to this global public health problem, although this remains a debatable topic owing to limited data. This review aims to provide insights into the current role of metals (i.e., copper, arsenic, and mercury) and organic acids in the emergence and spread of AMR in the food chain. Based on a thorough literature review, this study adopts a unique integrative approach, analyzing in detail the known antimicrobial mechanisms of metals and organic acids, as well as the molecular adaptive tolerance strategies developed by diverse bacteria to overcome their action. Additionally, the interplay between the tolerance to metals or organic acids and AMR is explored, with particular focus on co-selection events. Through a comprehensive analysis, this review highlights potential silent drivers of AMR within the food chain and the need for further research at molecular and epidemiological levels across different food contexts worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Hotspots and Drivers of Antimicrobial Resistance)
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