Special Issue "Gastrointestinal Health of Dogs and Cats"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Veronica Marchetti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Veterinary Clinical Medicine Department, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: small animal gastroenterology; oncology; internal medicine; clinical pathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am excited to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue on animal gastroenterology that I have the honor of editing for Animals.

Gastroenterology in the daily lives of companion animals has become a dominant field with new approaches to the various gastroenterological diseases. The research on dysbiosis has allowed for a better understanding of its role in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal inflammation, and in hepatic and pancreatic involvement.

This aspect has become very important in recent years and has made it necessary to review the therapeutic approaches. First of all, there are limitations regarding the use of antibiotics, respecting international guidelines for the control of antibiotic resistance. On the other hand, small animal gastroenterology, in line with human medicine, provides interesting research topics on the relationship between the digestive system and systems that may be directly or indirectly involved in the pathological process and in influencing the general prognosis and therapeutic approach.

This Special Issue of Animals aims to disseminate some of the most significant and recent research regarding gastroenterology in dogs and cats. Authors are invited to submit original research papers and review articles exploring hepatic, pancreatic and gastrointestinal diseases.

Dr. Veronica Marchetti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cats
  • dogs
  • intestinal disease
  • pancreatic disease
  • hepatic disease
  • dysbiosis
  • microbiota
  • systemic inflammatory response syndrome

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Immunosuppressant-Responsive Enteropathy and Non-Responsive Enteropathy in Dogs: Prognostic Factors, Short- and Long-Term Follow Up
Animals 2021, 11(9), 2637; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092637 - 08 Sep 2021
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Abstract
A multicentre prospective study was performed to assess whether clinical, hematobiochemical, endoscopic and histopathological parameters were associated with mortality, clinical response and relapse of disease in short- and long-term follow-up of a total of 165 dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy, of which 150 [...] Read more.
A multicentre prospective study was performed to assess whether clinical, hematobiochemical, endoscopic and histopathological parameters were associated with mortality, clinical response and relapse of disease in short- and long-term follow-up of a total of 165 dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy, of which 150 had immunosuppressant responsive enteropathy (IRE), and 15 had non-responsive enteropathy (NRE) dogs. Clinical severity (CCECAI) was evaluated from presentation (T0) to 18 months (T18) from diagnosis. T0 body condition score (BCS), selected haematological parameters and endoscopic and histopathological scores were evaluated. Presence/absence of histopathological duodenal lesions was recorded. Responders were evaluated using CCECAI at T1. Relapse was evaluated from T3 to T18. Long-term responders included dogs who responded at T1 and showed no relapse. Dogs were divided into responders/non-responders, survivors/non-survivors and relapsed/non-relapsed. At T1, 15/165 dogs (9%) were considered NRE. Sixteen dogs (11%) were considered relapsed at T3, 8% at T6 and 10% at T12, and none of 96 dogs relapsed at T18. NREs showed significantly lower BCS than IREs. Non-survivors showed a significantly lower serum albumin concentration and BCS than survivors. Non-responders, relapsed or non-survivors had higher presence of lacteal dilatation compared to long-term responders. Dogs with IRE showed a good clinical course with a low relapse rate, with only a few dogs in the NRE group. Reduction of BCS, albumin and lacteal dilatation at diagnosis may be considered negative prognostic factors for response, mortality and long-term disease remission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastrointestinal Health of Dogs and Cats)
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Article
Detection of Anti-Erythrocyte Antibodies in Dogs with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
Animals 2021, 11(9), 2580; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092580 - 02 Sep 2021
Viewed by 460
Abstract
Several extra-intestinal manifestations, including immune-mediated cytopenias, are reported in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), whereas they are poorly documented in dogs. Hypothesizing that immune-mediated subclinical anemia can occur in canine IBD, the study aim was to evaluate the erythrogram and the presence of [...] Read more.
Several extra-intestinal manifestations, including immune-mediated cytopenias, are reported in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), whereas they are poorly documented in dogs. Hypothesizing that immune-mediated subclinical anemia can occur in canine IBD, the study aim was to evaluate the erythrogram and the presence of anti-RBC antibodies in dogs with IBD. IBD was diagnosed according to the following criteria: chronic gastrointestinal signs, ruling out of extra-intestinal diseases, no improvement with diet trial, histological evidence of inflammatory infiltration, and improvement after immunosuppressant therapy. Canine Chronic Enteropathy Clinical Activity Index (CCECAI) endoscopic and histopathological scores were assessed for each dog. Twenty-five dogs were enrolled, and each dog had a CBC evaluation prior to endoscopy. The CBC was performed using laser hematology analyzer and blood smears were carefully reviewed for the presence of nucleated RBC, anisocytosis, polychromasia, and Howell–Jolly bodies. IgG and IgM anti-RBC antibodies were evaluated with flow cytometry. A high frequency of positive cases for anti-RBC antibodies in dogs with IBD (17/25 dogs) was ascertained. Approximatively 50% of dogs showed some hematologic features of RBC regeneration in addition to hematologic findings consistent with chronic inflammation. Anti-RBC antibodies and signs of erythroid regeneration may suggest possible subclinical chronic immune-mediated hemolysis that can cause anemia in dogs with IBD, together with the chronic inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastrointestinal Health of Dogs and Cats)
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Article
Evaluation of Prognostic Factors, including Duodenal P-Glycoprotein Expression, in Canine Chronic Enteropathy
Animals 2021, 11(8), 2315; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082315 - 05 Aug 2021
Viewed by 879
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to evaluate which factors, including expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a membrane-bound protein involved in multiple drug resistance, could predict the response to treatment in canine immunosuppressant-responsive enteropathy (IRE). Dogs with IRE or non-responsive enteropathy (NRE) [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to evaluate which factors, including expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a membrane-bound protein involved in multiple drug resistance, could predict the response to treatment in canine immunosuppressant-responsive enteropathy (IRE). Dogs with IRE or non-responsive enteropathy (NRE) that were examined from 2005 to 2014 were included and were divided into two groups (IRE vs. NRE). Signalment, history, and clinical and laboratory findings were collected. P-glycoprotein immunohistochemistry was carried out on duodenal biopsies of both groups stored in our biobank, and immunophenotyping and molecular clonality were performed on the NRE samples. Ninety-two dogs were enrolled, 73 IRE (79.3%) and 19 NRE (20.7%), with a prevalence of pure breed (78.3% vs. 21.7%) and male dogs (p < 0.001). Factors associated with a worse prognosis were previous treatment with steroids (p = 0.033) and lower serum total protein concentration (p = 0.005). Clonality testing on the NRE duodenal biopsies showed 5/16 clonal responses, assuming a latent undiagnosed lymphoma as a possible cause of the NRE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastrointestinal Health of Dogs and Cats)
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