Special Issue "Avian Pathology"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Birds".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Alessandro Fioretti
Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples Federico II, via Mezzocannone, 8-80134 Napoli, Italy
Interests: avian diseases; wildlife diseases; infectious and zoonotic diseases; antimicrobial resistance

Special Issue Information

There are four main types of disease affecting avian species: metabolic and nutritional diseases, infectious diseases, parasitic diseases, and behavioral diseases. Although avian diseases from nutritional and metabolic causes can be of concern, diseases that are caused by infectious agents can exert damaging—and sometimes immediate—negative effects on the profitability of commercial operations, especially at the poultry level. Furthermore, anyone who keeps birds, whether as pets or as production animals, should be aware that certain avian diseases are zoonotic—that is, they can be transmitted to humans.

This Special Issue aims to gather innovative research on the epidemiology, diagnosis, control, and treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases of all avian species, including domestic, wild, and companion birds. Papers on avian diseases relevant to the etiology, pathogenesis, or characterization of pathogens, innate and immune responses, antimicrobial resistance, vaccines, or genetics will also be considered.

Prof. Alessandro Fioretti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • avian diseases
  • zoonoses
  • emerging infectious diseases
  • prevention and control
  • pathogenesis
  • antimicrobial resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessCommunication
High Frequency and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in the Microbiota of Broiler Chickens in Tunisia
Animals 2021, 11(2), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020377 - 02 Feb 2021
Viewed by 299
Abstract
Tetracycline resistance is still considered one of the most abundant antibiotic resistances among pathogenic and commensal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of tetracycline resistance (tet) genes in broiler chickens in Tunisia, and this was done [...] Read more.
Tetracycline resistance is still considered one of the most abundant antibiotic resistances among pathogenic and commensal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of tetracycline resistance (tet) genes in broiler chickens in Tunisia, and this was done by PCR. Individual cloacal swabs from 195 broiler chickens were collected at two slaughterhouses in the governorate of Ben Arous (Grand Tunis, Tunisia). Chickens were from 7 farms and belonged to 13 lots consisting of 15 animals randomly selected. DNA was extracted and tested for 14 tet genes. All the lots examined were positive for at least 9 tet genes, with an average number of 11 tet genes per lot. Of the 195 animals tested, 194 (99%) were positive for one or more tet genes. Tet(L), tet(M) and tet(O) genes were found in 98% of the samples, followed by tet(A) in 90.2%, tet(K) in 88.7% and tet(Q) in 80%. These results confirm the antimicrobial resistance impact in the Tunisian poultry sector and suggest the urgent need to establish a robust national antimicrobial resistance monitoring plan. Furthermore, the molecular detection of antibiotic resistance genes directly in biological samples seems to be a useful means for epidemiological investigations of the spread of resistance determinants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Avian Pathology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enteropathogenic Bacteria in Yellow-Legged Gulls (Larus michahellis) in Southern Italy
Animals 2021, 11(2), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020275 - 22 Jan 2021
Viewed by 352
Abstract
Wild birds may host and spread pathogens, integrating the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Particularly, Larus spp. have been described as responsible for the spread of many enteric diseases, primarily because of their large populations at landfill sites. The aim of this study was [...] Read more.
Wild birds may host and spread pathogens, integrating the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Particularly, Larus spp. have been described as responsible for the spread of many enteric diseases, primarily because of their large populations at landfill sites. The aim of this study was to examine the role of yellow-legged gulls as a source of enteropathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Yersinia spp., with particular attention to antibiotic-resistant strains. Enteropathogenic bacteria were isolated from 93/225 yellow-legged gulls examined from April to July, during a four-year period (2016–2019). Specifically, Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 60/225 samples (26.7%), and identified as C. coli (36/60) and as C. jejuni (24/60). Salmonella spp. was isolated from 3/225 samples (1.3%), and identified as Salmonella arizonae. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli were isolated from 30/225 samples (13.3%) samples, and serotyped as E. coli O128 (12/30) O26 (9/30), O157 (6/30) and O11 (3/30); Yersinia spp. was never detected. Isolated strains exhibited multidrug resistance, including vitally important antibiotics for human medicine (i.e., fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines). Our study emphasizes the importance of yellow-legged gulls as potential reservoirs of pathogenic and resistant strains and their involvement in the dissemination of these bacteria across different environments, with resulting public health concerns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Avian Pathology)
Back to TopTop