Primatology and the Achievement of the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal System and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2022) | Viewed by 8468

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: animal communication; bioacoustics; primate conservation; lemur; Madagascar
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Guest Editor
Department of Anthropology, Washington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, MO, USA
Interests: behavioral ecology; biological anthropology; spatial ecology; biodiversity conservation; lemurs
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 17 UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a call to action for an integrated approach and concrete measures to pursue a necessary global shift to a new social, economic, and environmental paradigm (https://sdgs.un.org/goals). Developing countries, where most non-human primate species’ geographic range is found, are facing significant socioeconomic challenges with disruptive consequences on the environment, leading to conservation issues such as habitat loss, illegal harvesting and hunting, human–wildlife conflict, and invasive species, to name a few. Long-term research is known for its importance in the study of long-living primate species and providing information for the implementation of conservation plans. In addition, it offers stable and continuous collaborations with local governments and public and private institutions, as well as economic growth, support, and empowerment of local communities.

As primatologists working on species inhabiting developing countries, we are facing social and ethical responsibilities acknowledging the urgent need of socioeconomic development as the viable way to achieve conservation goals. In response to the need to identify and share effective strategies and metrics for a global, balanced, and inclusive development, you are invited to contribute to this Special Issue which aims to highlight the instrumental role that long-term research studies on primates’ biology and conservation have in promoting sustainable growth.

We are particularly interested in contributions in the form of original research or reviews regarding (but not limited to):

  • How research activities are tackling the urgent need of conservation actions in developing countries within the framework of governmental policies;
  • The development of metrics to measure socioeconomic impacts of long-term research studies in the field;
  • Strategies to develop local empowerment of cooperation projects between local organizations and research institutions;
  • Research studies with an impact on non-human primate conservation, economic growth, support, and empowerment of local communities;
  • Current research work conducted on non-human primates in the frame of the 2030 SDGs.

Join the challenge to publish a Special Issue that shares the actions taken by primatologists to address all 17 SDGs.

Prof. Dr. Christina Giacoma
Dr. Giovanna Bonadonna
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • primate conservation projects
  • long-term studies
  • field station
  • cooperation project
  • UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals
  • sustainable development
  • socioeconomic impact
  • social and ethical responsibility
  • inclusive development

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1367 KiB  
Article
Zoo-Led Initiatives and Their Role in Lemur Conservation In Situ
by Caterina Spiezio, Barbara Regaiolli, Margherita Savonitto, Simon Bruslund and Stefano Vaglio
Animals 2022, 12(20), 2772; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12202772 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2190
Abstract
We examined wider society’s ability to achieve biodiversity conservation and management targets using lemurs as a case study. We evaluated the impact on lemur conservation in situ by conservation initiatives led by European zoos in Madagascar exploring the European Association of Zoos and [...] Read more.
We examined wider society’s ability to achieve biodiversity conservation and management targets using lemurs as a case study. We evaluated the impact on lemur conservation in situ by conservation initiatives led by European zoos in Madagascar exploring the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria’s Conservation Database projects in terms of performed actions and achieved goals as well as communication to the public. We found that zoo-led conservation initiatives may have a positive impact on the ground and tend to achieve most conservation goals related to wild lemurs. However, we suggest that such conservation programmes should underline that they target further lemur species beyond the flagship charismatic species and that enhanced communication efforts would be beneficial to further raise public awareness. Full article
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18 pages, 1238 KiB  
Article
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Primate Research and Conservation
by Kim E. Reuter, Seheno Andriantsaralaza, Malene Friis Hansen, Marni LaFleur, Leandro Jerusalinsky, Edward E. Louis, Jonah Ratzimbazafy, Elizabeth A. Williamson and Russell A. Mittermeier
Animals 2022, 12(9), 1214; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12091214 - 08 May 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3080
Abstract
There is evidence to suggest that the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may hamper our achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here, we use non-human primates as a case study to examine the impacts of COVID-19 on the ability to achieve biodiversity [...] Read more.
There is evidence to suggest that the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may hamper our achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here, we use non-human primates as a case study to examine the impacts of COVID-19 on the ability to achieve biodiversity conservation and management sustainability targets. We collected data through a survey of members of the IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group from January to March 2022. Of the 93 experts that responded to our survey, we found that 39% had not been able to visit any of their field sites since March 2020, 54% said they had less funding available for their primate-related work, and only one out of ten said they had managed to achieve at least 76–100% of their planned primate-related work since March 2020. Six out of ten respondents (61%) felt that primate conservation efforts in protected areas were worse than before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and one-third (33%) felt hunting was happening more frequently than before. This study provides evidence of the impacts of COVID-19 on progress towards achieving the SDGs, and provides practical lessons learned for biodiversity conservation efforts moving forward. Full article
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Review

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15 pages, 3030 KiB  
Review
Primate Conservation Efforts and Sustainable Development Goals in Ecuador, Combining Research, Education and Capacity Building
by Stella de la Torre and Citlalli Morelos-Juárez
Animals 2022, 12(20), 2750; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12202750 - 13 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1499
Abstract
Ecuadorian primates are a diverse and ecologically important group that is facing severe conservation problems. We present the experiences and lessons learned from two primate conservation projects in eastern and western Ecuador to foster an in-depth reflection of what could be improved to [...] Read more.
Ecuadorian primates are a diverse and ecologically important group that is facing severe conservation problems. We present the experiences and lessons learned from two primate conservation projects in eastern and western Ecuador to foster an in-depth reflection of what could be improved to enhance their contribution to the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By combining research, education, and capacity building, both projects aim to empower and engage local communities in initiatives to protect primate habitats. These efforts to enhance local environmental sustainability contribute to SDGs 15 (Life on land), 4 (Quality of education), 2 (Zero hunger), 3 (Good health and well-being), 5 (Gender equality), 10 (Reduced inequalities), 12 (Responsible consumption and production), and 13 (Climate actions). One of our findings is that community involvement in conservation activities is not always directly related to an improvement of the conservation status of primate populations. Therefore, continuous monitoring of primate populations and of other relevant indicators is key to assessing the effectiveness of the interventions. We highlight the importance of sharing information between projects with similar scopes and the need to develop local indicators for a more objective assessment of the contribution of small-scale conservation projects to the delivery of the SDGs. Full article
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