Advances in Equine Breeding and Fertility Technologies

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1846

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Veterinary Reproduction Group, Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
Interests: sperm; oocyte; embryo; cryopreservation; equine; donkey; in vitro fertilization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture and Food Sustainability, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia
Interests: sperm; oocyte; embryo; cryopreservation; equine; donkey; in vitro fertilization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Veterinary Reproduction Group, Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
Interests: sperm analysis; sperm selection; gamete and embryo cryopreservation; equine reproduction; canine reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Veterinary Reproduction Group, Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
Interests: sperm analysis; sperm selection; gamete and embryo cryopreservation; equine reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Assisted reproductive technologies in equids are undergoing continuous transformation. The advent of cutting-edge diagnostic tools, including omics technologies, alongside innovative reproductive techniques such as gamete and embryo cryopreservation, in vitro fertilization, somatic-cell nuclear transfer and stem cells, presents a profound opportunity to enhance the reproductive efficiency of valuable equine individuals. Additionally, these advancements open doors to producing offspring from subfertile stallions and mares, while also serving as critical conservation strategies for endangered equid species.

The objective of this Special Issue is to curate a collection of state-of-the-art studies within the realm of assisted reproductive technologies in equids, with a particular focus on pioneering research that addresses the unique challenges faced by equids with fertility issues.

Dr. Isabel Ortiz
Dr. Andrés Gambini
Dr. Jesús Dorado
Dr. Manuel Hidalgo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cryopreservation
  • embryo
  • equine
  • fertility
  • ICSI
  • in vitro fertilization
  • omics
  • ovum pick up
  • SCNT
  • spermatology
  • stem cells

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 1836 KiB  
Article
Follicular Dynamics and Pregnancy Rates during Foal Heat in Colombian Paso Fino Mares Bred under Permanent Grazing
by Mauricio Cardona-García, Claudia Jiménez-Escobar, María S. Ferrer and Juan G. Maldonado-Estrada
Animals 2024, 14(5), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14050760 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1644
Abstract
No studies have evaluated the peripartum follicular dynamics resulting in foal heat under tropical environments. We aimed to assess retrospectively the peripartum follicular dynamics in Colombian Paso Fino mares that were inseminated at the foal heat, becoming pregnant or not. Records including follicular [...] Read more.
No studies have evaluated the peripartum follicular dynamics resulting in foal heat under tropical environments. We aimed to assess retrospectively the peripartum follicular dynamics in Colombian Paso Fino mares that were inseminated at the foal heat, becoming pregnant or not. Records including follicular dynamics of pregnant mares prepartum and from foaling until foal heat ovulation were assessed in Colombian Paso Fino mares (CPF, n = 24) bred under permanent grazing in a tropical herd in Colombia. The number of ovarian follicles >10 mm before foaling and the largest follicle (F1) growth rate (mm/day) from foaling until the F1 reached the largest diameter (pre-ovulatory size) at the foal heat were assessed. Mares were inseminated at foal heat with 20 mL of semen (at least 500 million live spermatozoa) with >75% motility and 80% viability from a stallion of proven fertility. Ovulation was confirmed the day after follicles had reached the largest diameter. Quantitative data from follicular growth, the day at ovulation, from mares that became pregnant (PM) or not (NPM) at 16 days post-insemination were compared by one-way ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA (follicle growth rate data) or Chi-square test (edema and cytology scores data). Epidemiological data, gestation length, and the number of follicles on third prepartum days did not significantly differ between PM and NPM (p > 0.05). Seventy-one percent of mares (17/24) got pregnant. Ovulatory follicles grew faster in the NPM group (n = 7), which ovulated between the seventh and ninth postpartum days, compared to PM (n = 17), which ovulated between the 11th and 13th postpartum days. Pre-ovulatory follicle diameter in PM (48.57 ± 0.8 mm) was significantly larger than in NPM (42.99 ± 1.0 mm) (p < 0.05). In addition, the PM edema score (2.93 ± 0.32 mm) on ovulation day was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than NPM (4.47 ± 0.05 mm). First postpartum ovulation occurred at 12.6 ± 0.3 and 8.5 ± 0.4 days (p < 0.05) in PM and NPM, respectively. Colombian Paso Fino mares bred under permanent grazing under tropical rainforest conditions with no foaling or postpartum complications showed a 71% gestation rate when inseminated at foal heat when ovulation occurs between the second and third postpartum week. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Equine Breeding and Fertility Technologies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop