Equine Veterinary Surgery

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2024 | Viewed by 3680

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Medicina y Cirugía Animal, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain
Interests: orthopedics; lameness; soft tissue
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain
Interests: soft tissue; respiratory; orthopaedics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is an honor and an opportunity for us to be able to participate in this Special Issue of Animals as editors. A constant attribute of veterinary clinical practice is evolving, and this is especially through equine veterinary surgery. This development is not only due to the greater experience of equine surgeons but also to the increasingly real possibility of being able to perform procedures in standing horses, which were previously unimaginable, and to the constant technological evolution that surgeons must take advantage of, showing its maximum development with the minimally invasive surgical techniques. In addition, there is no doubt that the success of any surgical procedure depends on many actors forming a team, starting with the owner, trainer, referring veterinarians, and specialist surgeons, all of whom have the support of basic and clinical researchers. Therefore, any help or information we can offer to this "team" will help improve the success of our treatments and procedures, allowing equine surgery to continue resolving conditions that improve the prognosis of our patients and ensure our equine athletes continue with their sporting activity.

We would therefore like to thank all the colleagues who collaborate in this Special Issue and who, thanks to this, will allow us to substantially improve the health of our horses.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together the highest number of scientific articles, both experimental and clinical studies, but also high-quality reviews, showing the evolution of equine surgery in recent years and helping us to delve into the different treatments available, their advantages over possible therapeutic alternatives, and the changes in classic techniques, taking advantage of technological developments and the possibility of performing procedures in the standing horse. Finally, we would like to thank Animals for continuing to try to provide useful information for all equine-practicing veterinarians.

Dr. Javier Lopez-Sanroman
Dr. Manuel Iglesias-Garcia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • equine
  • surgery
  • minimally invasive
  • orthopedics
  • colic
  • integumentary

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 1475 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Excision Interval on Equine Melanoma Progression: Time Matters?
by José Pimenta, Justina Prada, Isabel Pires and Mário Cotovio
Animals 2024, 14(8), 1244; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14081244 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1132
Abstract
Equine melanomas are a common neoplasm in gray horses. However, scientific knowledge about their progression over time is quite scarce. Some owners and veterinarians still believe that early intervention is not necessary, stating that tumors evolve very slowly and intervention could worsen the [...] Read more.
Equine melanomas are a common neoplasm in gray horses. However, scientific knowledge about their progression over time is quite scarce. Some owners and veterinarians still believe that early intervention is not necessary, stating that tumors evolve very slowly and intervention could worsen the animal’s condition. This work aims to identify clinical and histological differences that may exist between equine melanomas with different excision intervals (time between tumor detection and surgical excision). A total of 42 tumors (13 benign and 29 malignant) from 34 horses were included in this study. There was a statistically significant association between excision interval and tumor size (p = 0.038), with tumors excised later being significantly larger than the ones excised sooner. The excision interval was also statistically associated with the number of tumors (p = 0.011), since the horses that carried a tumor for longer seemed to be prone to have multiple tumors. Furthermore, there was an association between excision interval and malignancy (p = 0.035), with tumor excised later being fives times more likely to be malignant. This study provides evidence of delayed excision’s effect on the progression of equine melanomas. Additionally, it reinforces the importance of the early excision of these tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Equine Veterinary Surgery)
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10 pages, 450 KiB  
Article
Treatment Comparison for Medial Femoral Condyle Subchondral Cystic Lesions and Prognosis in Yearling Thoroughbred Racehorse Prospects
by Marcos Pérez-Nogués, Gabriel Manso-Díaz, Michael Spirito and Javier López-Sanromán
Animals 2024, 14(7), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14071122 - 6 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1019
Abstract
Subchondral cystic lesions (SCL) in the medial femoral condyle are a usual finding in Thoroughbred survey and auction repository radiographs. Several treatments with different outcomes have been studied over the years to improve soundness and racing prognosis. Our objective was to report the [...] Read more.
Subchondral cystic lesions (SCL) in the medial femoral condyle are a usual finding in Thoroughbred survey and auction repository radiographs. Several treatments with different outcomes have been studied over the years to improve soundness and racing prognosis. Our objective was to report the racing prognosis in Thoroughbred yearlings intended for racing that were diagnosed with SCL in the medial femoral condyle and were treated using four current and different techniques: intralesional injection of corticosteroids, SCL debridement through the joint with a drill bit, translesional cortical screw placement, and absorbable hydroxyapatite implant placement. Data from 182 Thoroughbred yearlings treated for SCL in the medial femoral condyle were collected from 2014 to 2020. Limb affected, age at surgery, sex, and radiographic measurements of the SCL were recorded. Auction price and racing performance were collected for treated horses and compared to 154 maternal siblings free of medial femoral condyle SCL. Analyses were conducted to assess if racing prognosis was affected by SCL size, to detect differences in auction price and selected flat racing outcome parameters between cases and controls, and to compare racing prognosis between the studied treatments. Mares and lesions located in the right stifle were significantly overrepresented. The auction price of treated horses was significantly lower than that of their siblings. Horses treated for SCL had significantly lower chances to start in a race than controls (59% vs. 74% respectively). Wider SCL negatively affected the chances to start at least in one race, and negatively affected the earnings made in the 2-year-olds’ racing year. Horses with SCL treated using a bioabsorbable implant had a significantly higher median in starts as 3-year-olds (seven starts) than horses that had the SCL debrided with a drill bit (three starts). In conclusion, Thoroughbred yearlings treated for a medial femoral condyle SCL had lower auction prices and decreased ability to start a race compared to siblings’ wider cysts had worse prognosis to start a race and might affect earnings as 2-year-olds; and horses treated with bioabsorbable composite implant placement had more starts as 3-year-olds than with other techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Equine Veterinary Surgery)
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Review

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23 pages, 1131 KiB  
Review
The Best Protocol to Treat Equine Skin Wounds by Second Intention Healing: A Scoping Review of the Literature
by Gesiane Ribeiro, Lúcia Carvalho, João Borges and José Prazeres
Animals 2024, 14(10), 1500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14101500 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 1129
Abstract
Equine skin wound treatment continues to be a challenge for veterinarians. Despite being a frequent practice, it remains difficult to choose an evidence-based treatment protocol. This study aimed to comprehensively explore the literature and provide a scoping review of therapeutic strategies for equine [...] Read more.
Equine skin wound treatment continues to be a challenge for veterinarians. Despite being a frequent practice, it remains difficult to choose an evidence-based treatment protocol. This study aimed to comprehensively explore the literature and provide a scoping review of therapeutic strategies for equine skin wounds and identify knowledge gaps and opportunities for future research. This review was conducted using specific criteria to select literature that described methods to manage second intention wound healing. After removing duplicates and screening papers for suitability, 81 manuscripts were included for data extraction. Of these, 59 articles were experimental studies, 10 were case reports, 9 were case series, and 3 were clinical studies. The most frequent wound location was the distal limbs. Macroscopic assessment was the main tool used to evaluate treatment effectiveness. All of the case reports, case series, and clinical studies reported positive outcomes with regard to the treatment used, while only 36% of the experimental studies found significant healing improvement in treated wounds compared to control groups. It was found that there are many treatments that have exhibited controversial results, and there exists a lack of evidence for the adoption of specific treatment protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Equine Veterinary Surgery)
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