Special Issue "Animal Experimentation: State of the Art and Future Scenarios"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Ethics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Federica Pirrone
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: Ethology; animal physiology; neuroendocrinology; human-animal bond
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Augusto Vitale
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Behavioural Science and Mental Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy
Interests: Animal Welfare, Ethics of Research, Primatology, Ethology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Animal experimentation continues to be a source of debate within the scientific community and society. Since the publication of the Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals for scientific purposes, the quality of life of laboratory animals has improved significantly. However, many aspects still remain critical and require discussion. For example, although alternatives have been successfully applied in some cases, the number of animals used in EU laboratories is not declining as we hoped. In certain cases, the number has even increased (i.e., the use of nonhuman primates for regulatory purposes).

The aim of this Special Issue is to try to provide a realistic view of the state of the art of the use of animals in basic and applied research, and to propose possible future scenarios.

The practice of animal experimentation is multifactorial. Thus, articles focusing on the scientific, ethical, normative, and/or societal issues related to animal experimentation will be welcome, which may help to highlight the current strengths and weaknesses of the use of animal models.

Dr. Pirrone Federica
Dr. Augusto Vitale
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Legislation
  • Animal experiments
  • Ethics of research
  • Nonhuman primates
  • Biomedicine
  • Regulatory studies
  • Toxicology
  • Animal welfare
  • The 3 Rs principle

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Animal Research beyond the Laboratory: Report from a Workshop on Places Other than Licensed Establishments (POLEs) in the UK
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101868 - 13 Oct 2020
Abstract
Research involving animals that occurs outside the laboratory raises an array of unique challenges. With regard to UK legislation, however, it receives only limited attention in terms of official guidelines, support, and statistics, which are unsurprisingly orientated towards the laboratory environment in which [...] Read more.
Research involving animals that occurs outside the laboratory raises an array of unique challenges. With regard to UK legislation, however, it receives only limited attention in terms of official guidelines, support, and statistics, which are unsurprisingly orientated towards the laboratory environment in which the majority of animal research takes place. In September 2019, four social scientists from the Animal Research Nexus program gathered together a group of 13 experts to discuss nonlaboratory research under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (A(SP)A) of 1986 (mirroring European Union (EU) Directive 2010/63/EU), which is the primary mechanism for regulating animal research in the UK. Such nonlaboratory research under the A(SP)A often occurs at Places Other than Licensed Establishments (POLEs). The primary objective of the workshop was to assemble a diverse group with experience across a variety of POLEs (e.g., wildlife field sites, farms, fisheries, veterinary clinics, zoos) to explore the practical, ethical, and regulatory challenges of conducting research at POLEs. While consensus was not sought, nor reached on every point of discussion, we collectively identified five key areas that we propose require further discussion and attention. These relate to: (1) support and training; (2) ethical review; (3) cultures of care, particularly in nonregulated research outside of the laboratory; (4) the setting of boundaries; and (5) statistics and transparency. The workshop generated robust discussion and thereby highlighted the value of focusing on the unique challenges posed by POLEs, and the need for further opportunities for exchanging experiences and sharing best practice relating to research projects outside of the laboratory in the UK and elsewhere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Experimentation: State of the Art and Future Scenarios)
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