Special Issue "Dynamics of Root–Soil–Microbial Interactions"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Yinglong Chen

The UWA Institute of Agriculture, and School of Agriculture & Environment, Perth WA 6009, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: root system architecture and functions; root models and simulations; rhizosphere interactions; plant physiology; mycorrhizal technology and applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Root health has become a new focus in plant science, with a particular interest in rhizosphere interactions. The rhizosphere is the home and interface of various types of microbial species and populations, both symbiotic and pathogenic, and the dynamic root–soil interface influences root function and eventually plant growth and production. The main focus of this Special Issue would be on the advances in our understanding on the enhanced root function through the interaction of rhizosphere microbes, such as mycorrhizal fungi, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and Frankia, and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), but pathogenic interactions are also important. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an insight into the dynamics of root–soil–microbial interactions in major agricultural crops.

Dr. Yinglong Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rhizosphere interaction
  • mycorrhiza
  • rhizobia
  • plant growth promoting bacteria
  • root function
  • soil microbiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Grasslands and Croplands Have Different Microbial Biomass Carbon Levels per Unit of Soil Organic Carbon
Agriculture 2017, 7(7), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7070057
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 5 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
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Abstract
Primarily using cropped systems, previous studies have reported a positive linear relationship between microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil organic carbon (SOC). We conducted a meta-analysis to explore this relationship separately for grasslands and croplands using available literature. Studies were limited to those [...] Read more.
Primarily using cropped systems, previous studies have reported a positive linear relationship between microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil organic carbon (SOC). We conducted a meta-analysis to explore this relationship separately for grasslands and croplands using available literature. Studies were limited to those using fumigation–extraction for MBC for field samples. Trials were noted separately where records were distinct in space or time. Grasslands were naturally occurring, restored, or seeded. Cropping systems were typical of the temperate zone. MBC had a positive linear response to increasing SOC that was significant in both grasslands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.76) and croplands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.48). However, MBC increased 2.5-fold more steeply per unit of increasing SOC for grassland soils, as compared to the corresponding response in cropland soils. Expressing MBC as a proportion of SOC across the regression overall, slopes corresponded to 2.7% for grasslands and 1.1% for croplands. The slope of the linear relationship for grasslands was significantly (p = 0.0013) steeper than for croplands. The difference between the two systems is possibly caused by a greater proportion of SOC in grasslands being active rather than passive, relative to that in croplands, with that active fraction promoting the formation of MBC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Root–Soil–Microbial Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Plant Performance in Cicer arietinum L. Due to the Addition of a Combination of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria
Agriculture 2017, 7(5), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7050040
Received: 27 February 2017 / Revised: 24 April 2017 / Accepted: 27 April 2017 / Published: 2 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (429 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Current agriculture is based on external fertilizers that jeopardize soil fertility. Alternative fertilization systems might come from the use of soil-borne bacteria with plant growth enhancing ability. Here, six bacterial strains that produce varying concentrations of indole acetic acid (IAA) were tested individually [...] Read more.
Current agriculture is based on external fertilizers that jeopardize soil fertility. Alternative fertilization systems might come from the use of soil-borne bacteria with plant growth enhancing ability. Here, six bacterial strains that produce varying concentrations of indole acetic acid (IAA) were tested individually and in consortia for plant growth promotion and fitness-related traits of Cicer arietinum. The nitrogen fixer Mesorhizobium ciceri consistently increased biomass production and N content. In the absence of this strain, IAA Psedomonas putida and Bacillus megaterium hindered plant growth and fitness-related traits. The application of mixes of the three strains always resulted in better plant performance when M. ciceri was present. Mixes that included a P. putida strain that produced low levels of IAA appeared more likely to promote plant growth than mixes that included P. putida strains that produced high levels of IAA or mixes that included B. megaterium. The low levels of IAA produced by the selected strains, compared to the high IAA-producing strains had a significantly greater positive effect on plant biomass accumulation, flower, pod, and seed production, and total plant nitrogen and nitrogen concentrations in seeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Root–Soil–Microbial Interactions)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Advances in Eco-Efficient Agriculture: The Plant-Soil Mycobiome
Agriculture 2017, 7(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7020014
Received: 10 November 2016 / Revised: 23 January 2017 / Accepted: 8 February 2017 / Published: 15 February 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to achieve a desirable ecological and sustainable agriculture a thorough understanding of the plant-soil mycobiome is imperative. Commercial industrial agriculture alters greenhouse gas emissions, promotes loss of plant and soil biodiversity, increases pollution by raising atmospheric CO2, and releases [...] Read more.
In order to achieve a desirable ecological and sustainable agriculture a thorough understanding of the plant-soil mycobiome is imperative. Commercial industrial agriculture alters greenhouse gas emissions, promotes loss of plant and soil biodiversity, increases pollution by raising atmospheric CO2, and releases pesticides, thus affecting both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Diversified farming systems, including perennial cultivated pastures, are among worldwide strategies that aim to reduce terrestrial greenhouse gas emissions and deal with threats to global sustainability. Additionally, stimulation of soil microbes and appropriate soil management can influence soil interactions as well as the rates of organic matter decomposition and the release of gases. Agricultural soil microbial communities play a central role in ecosystem processes and are affected by biocontrol agents, biofertilizers, and exposure to pesticides, the extent to which is yet to be fully elucidated. Intercropping different plant species is beneficial, as this can increase carbon fixation by plants, transferring carbon to the soil, especially via mycorrhizas, thus modifying interplant interactions. This review focuses on agro-ecosystems, showing the latest advances in the plant-soil interface (the mycobiome) for an eco-efficient agricultural production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Root–Soil–Microbial Interactions)
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