Mushroom Cultivation: Growing for Quality

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 7592

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, University of Tasmania, 7008 New Town, Tasmania, Australia
Interests: mushroom disease; mushroom farm hygiene; mushroom farm IPDM; exotic mushroom cultivation; extension

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Mushrooms have been cultivated for many centuries for their gourmet, nutritive and medicinal properties and are a significant food source for many millions of people worldwide, yielding an estimated 12,000,000 tonnes in 2019. While the white button mushroom (Agaricus) comprises about 30% of production, a number of other genera such as Pleurotus, Flammulina, Lentinula, Ganoderma, Grifola, and Volvariella constitute the remainder. Mushrooms are cultivated sustainably on substrates composed primarily of agricultural waste products which, when spent, can be utilised for soil enhancement and environmental remediation.

In the fresh market, the primary indicators of mushroom freshness and quality are colour and texture. Quality is largely determined by careful crop husbandry, but because they lack a waxy cuticle or protective skin like other fruits and vegetables, mushrooms are susceptible to discolouration caused by water imbalance, bruising, and insect and microbial attack.

Research articles will cover topics related to the composition, structure, and physicochemical properties of mushroom substrates and all aspects of crop husbandry including water management and the impact and control of pests and diseases with the aim of maximising mushroom quality at harvest. For this Special Issue, we welcome all types of articles including original research, opinions, and reviews.

Dr. Warwick Gill
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Agaricus
  • casing
  • compost
  • disease
  • mushroom
  • quality
  • relative humidity
  • water potential
  • water relations
 

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 656 KiB  
Article
Effect of Applied Ozone Dose, Time of Ozonization, and Storage Time on Selected Physicochemical Characteristics of Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus)
by Magdalena Zalewska, Elżbieta Górska-Horczyczak and Monika Marcinkowska-Lesiak
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11080748 - 06 Aug 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2737
Abstract
The impact of ozone dose and time of ozonization on the selected physicochemical properties of Agaricus bisporus stored for 14 days in 2 °C was investigated. Mushrooms were subjected to gaseous ozone with increasing concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg L−1 [...] Read more.
The impact of ozone dose and time of ozonization on the selected physicochemical properties of Agaricus bisporus stored for 14 days in 2 °C was investigated. Mushrooms were subjected to gaseous ozone with increasing concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg L−1 and applied two times to ozonization: 30 and 60 min. The following parameters were evaluated: weight loss, internal and external color L*a*b* parameters, overall color change (ΔE), browning index (BI), firmness, total phenolic content (TPC), and total antioxidant activity (TAA). After storage, mushrooms had a higher level of firmness, especially for group ozonized with 2 mg L−1 for 30 or 60 min. Mushrooms from group (1 mg L−1) subjected to ozonization within 30 and 60 min had a high ability to neutralize DPPH-free radical (42.45 ± 0.43 and 41.34 ± 0.29, respectively). Exposure of mushrooms to ozone atmosphere does not cause large changes in quality and physical parameters of Agaricus bisporus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mushroom Cultivation: Growing for Quality)
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8 pages, 423 KiB  
Article
A Case Study on Surplus Mushrooms Production: Extraction and Recovery of Vitamin D2
by Rossana V. C. Cardoso, Ângela Fernandes, João C. M. Barreira, Rui M. V. Abreu, Filipa Mandim, Ana M. Gonzaléz-Paramás, Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira and Lillian Barros
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11070579 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2770
Abstract
The presented case study illustrates the possibility of adding value to the biological surplus remaining from the mushroom cultivation industry. In essence, the unused mushroom parts were submitted to UV-C irradiation, with the purpose of increasing the vitamin D2 content and validating [...] Read more.
The presented case study illustrates the possibility of adding value to the biological surplus remaining from the mushroom cultivation industry. In essence, the unused mushroom parts were submitted to UV-C irradiation, with the purpose of increasing the vitamin D2 content and validating its extraction. Vitamin D2 concentration in three different mushroom species (Agaricus bisporus, A. bisporus Portobello, and Pleurotus ostreatus) was obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), by means of an ultraviolet (UV) detector. The method was validated using an A. bisporus Portobello sample, and its reproducibility and accuracy were confirmed. Independently of the UV-C irradiation dose, the effect on vitamin D2 concentration was significant, allowing it to increase from less than 4 µg/g dry weight (dw) to more than 100 µg/g dw in all mushroom species. These results are good indicators of the feasibility of industrial surplus mushrooms as sustainable vitamin D2 food sources, besides contributing to strengthen the circularity principals associated to the mushroom production chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mushroom Cultivation: Growing for Quality)
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