Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-Being

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387). This special issue belongs to the section "Leadership".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 33721

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Business and Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA 23464, USA
Interests: Servant leadership; person-organization fit; person job fit; values alignment

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Business and Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA 23464, USA
Interests: servant leadership; virtues and vices in leadership
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dr. Winston and Dr. Patterson invite you to propose an article for a special issue of Administrative Sciences on Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-being. The focus of the special issue is in keeping with Greenleaf’s test of servant leadership: “DO THOSE SERVED GROW AS PERSONS? DO THEY, WHILE BEING SERVED, BECOME HEALTHIER, WISER, FREER, MORE AUTONOMOUS, MORE LIKELY THEMSELVES TO BECOME SERVANTS?” (location 351 of 4357) (Greenleaf 2002).

Qualitative and quantitative empirical research studies are welcomed.

The special issue will include research that shows the impact of servant leadership on employees’ work satisfaction, organizational identity, organizational citizenship behaviors, employee engagement, and organizational commitment.

Greenleaf, R. K. (2002) Edited by Larry C. Spears. Servant Leadership: A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness 25th Anniversary Edition. Kindle Edition. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press

Dr. Bruce Winston
Dr. Kathleen Patterson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Servant Leadership
  • Well-being
  • Human Flourishing
  • Servant Followership
  • Person-organization fit

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Transformational Leadership across Cultures: Follower Perception and Satisfaction
by Arran Caza, Brianna B. Caza and Barry Z. Posner
Adm. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci11010032 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 9755
Abstract
Leading people from diverse cultures is centrally important in organizations. This study investigates the extent to which transformational leadership behaviors are universal: by examining if leaders and followers perceive transformational leadership behaviors the same way across cultures; and by determining if the magnitude [...] Read more.
Leading people from diverse cultures is centrally important in organizations. This study investigates the extent to which transformational leadership behaviors are universal: by examining if leaders and followers perceive transformational leadership behaviors the same way across cultures; and by determining if the magnitude of satisfaction that followers derive from transformational leadership behavior is the same across cultures. Survey data from 71,537 leaders and their direct reports (n = 203,027) from 77 countries were analyzed. Respondents represented hundreds of different organizations, 12 functional areas, 26 industries, and all management levels. Cultural universality was examined by comparing internal reliability scores and using multilevel mixed coefficient models to assess the similarity of effect sizes in across cultures. Regardless of culture, when interacting with leaders from their own culture, followers were universally alike in their perceptions of transformational leadership behavior and in their satisfaction with such behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-Being)
19 pages, 273 KiB  
Article
Does Stewardship Theory Provide a Viable Alternative to Control-Fixated Performance Management?
by Jacob Torfing and Tina Øllgaard Bentzen
Adm. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci10040086 - 3 Nov 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 9818
Abstract
Stewardship theory provides an interesting alternative to agency theory, which in the recent New Public Management era supported the introduction of rigorous performance management systems based on generalized mistrust in and control of public employees. However, we lack empirical validation of the feasibility [...] Read more.
Stewardship theory provides an interesting alternative to agency theory, which in the recent New Public Management era supported the introduction of rigorous performance management systems based on generalized mistrust in and control of public employees. However, we lack empirical validation of the feasibility and positive outcomes of the new forms of trust-based management recommended by stewardship theory. As such, there are few examples of alternative ways of boosting the motivation of public employees that can serve as beacons for public service organizations (PSOs) eager to find new ways of motivating their staff to create public value for the users of public services and society as a whole. This article aims to remedy this problem by exploring a seemingly successful empirical case of trust-based management to see whether the core principles of stewardship theory apply and how new management practices may influence the motivation and well-being of the employees, the perceived satisfaction and involvement of the users, and overall organizational performance, including cost efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-Being)
12 pages, 935 KiB  
Article
Does Work-Life Balance Moderate the Relationship between Career Commitment and Career Success? Evidence from an Emerging Asian Economy
by Usama Najam, Umar Burki and Wajiha Khalid
Adm. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci10040082 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5709
Abstract
This study examines the relationship between career commitment and employee career success (objective and subjective success) in middle-level employees working in the service sector. Further, the study investigates the moderating effect of work-life balance on the relationship between career commitment and career success. [...] Read more.
This study examines the relationship between career commitment and employee career success (objective and subjective success) in middle-level employees working in the service sector. Further, the study investigates the moderating effect of work-life balance on the relationship between career commitment and career success. By analyzing data from 360 middle level working employees, our empirical results show that career commitment has a positive and significant effect on the objective and subjective career success of employees. Work-life balance positively moderates the relationship between career commitment and subjective career success, whereas it fails to moderate the relationship between career commitment and objective career success. The study contributes by providing a better understanding of the employee’s perception of career commitment and career success and their management in emerging markets. Avenues for future research are identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-Being)
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19 pages, 510 KiB  
Article
Servant Leadership in the Context of Mosque: A Qualitative Case Study of Muslim Women’s Perspectives
by Sami Jabarkhail
Adm. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci10030072 - 13 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 7698
Abstract
This research provides an exploratory analysis of how Muslim women perceive servant leadership in the context of Mosque. The study consists of 8 long interviews with Muslim women, and conceptualizes sources of servant leadership in the context of Mosque by investigating Muslim women’s [...] Read more.
This research provides an exploratory analysis of how Muslim women perceive servant leadership in the context of Mosque. The study consists of 8 long interviews with Muslim women, and conceptualizes sources of servant leadership in the context of Mosque by investigating Muslim women’s perceptions of the Imam’s leadership style The emerging taxonomy illuminates five categories and fifteen sub-categories of Muslim women’s perceived servant leadership origin, relating to the impact Imam and Mosque have on: (1) Serviceability, (2) masculinity, (3) community, (4) accessibility, and (5) inclusivity. Findings show disparities between women and men and demonstrate the fact that Muslim women do benefit from Imam’s leadership, services, and resources offered in Mosque; however, the benefits to women are disproportionate and different from men. In addition to making a vital contribution to the scarce literature on Muslim women’s perspectives, this article provides stakeholders with a comprehensive set of issues which may evoke favorable/unfavorable perceptions and offers insight to direct improvement efforts in addressing these issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership and Followers’ Well-Being)
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