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Eur. Burn J., Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 8 articles

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11 pages, 15629 KiB  
Article
An Optical Tomography-Based Score to Assess Pediatric Hand Burns
by Judith Lindert, Tina Straube, Beke Larsen, Julia Siebert, Eirini Liodaki, Kianusch Tafazzoli-Lari and Lutz Wünsch
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 155-165; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020013 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 138
Abstract
To define the morphologic pattern of pediatric hand burns as visualized via optical coherence tomography (OCT) and dynamic OCT (D-OCT). We designed a scoring system to assess the depths of burn wounds on pediatric hands and tested this score in our cohort of [...] Read more.
To define the morphologic pattern of pediatric hand burns as visualized via optical coherence tomography (OCT) and dynamic OCT (D-OCT). We designed a scoring system to assess the depths of burn wounds on pediatric hands and tested this score in our cohort of children with burn injuries to the hand. Overall, 67 hand burns in 48 children (0–15 years) were prospectively examined. Scans were interpreted by two independent observers. Relevant OCT findings were surface irregularity, loss of epidermis, loss of dermal pattern (skin lines or papillary spots, loss of surface regularity and irregular vascular pattern of the plexus papillaris. Score values were calculated retrospectively. A score of 4 was associated with spontaneous healing without the need for skin grafting, with a positive predictive value of 97%. Deeper wounds with delayed healing and/or the need of skin grafting received a score of 5 or above, with an agreement of medical healing in 80% and a positive predictive value of 56%. OCT and D-OCT provide clinically useful additional information in cases of pediatric hand burns. The OCT burn score has the potential to support clinical decision making and, subsequently, improve clinical outcomes and shorten hospital stays. Full article
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10 pages, 1460 KiB  
Article
The Early Childhood Development of Pediatric Burn Patients
by Maxime D. Cuijpers, Moniek Akkerman, Martin G. A. Baartmans, Paul P. M. van Zuijlen and Anouk Pijpe
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 145-154; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020012 - 14 May 2024
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Abstract
Our study aimed to provide a description of the early childhood development of pediatric burn patients relative to Dutch reference values, using both pre- and post-burn data from the Dutch Development Instrument and the D-score. Data from the Dutch Development Instrument were [...] Read more.
Our study aimed to provide a description of the early childhood development of pediatric burn patients relative to Dutch reference values, using both pre- and post-burn data from the Dutch Development Instrument and the D-score. Data from the Dutch Development Instrument were used to calculate the D-score and age-standardized D-score. Similar to a growth chart, the D-score was used to plot pediatric burn patients’ development relative to Dutch reference values for their age. Pediatric burn patients’ (n = 38) median age at the time of injury was 1.0 (1.0–2.0) years old. Burn size ranged from 1.0% to 36.0% of the total body surface area. Ninety-five percent (± 6.0%) of pediatric burn patients passed each of the age-appropriate developmental milestones at the target age. The mean age-standardized D-score was just above the Dutch average (+0.49 SD [0.18, 0.80]) and did not vary depending on sex (p = 0.06) or burn size (p = 0.41). In conclusion, among pediatric patients aged up to two-and-a-half years old, with non-full thickness burns, development was on track relative to the Dutch reference values. Our findings offer valuable first insights into the early childhood development of pediatric burn patients and may alleviate some parental concerns. Full article
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19 pages, 12908 KiB  
Article
Acute Surgical and Rehabilitation Management of Complex Hand Burns in Combat Casualties
by Jill M. Cancio, Jonathan B. Lundy and Leopoldo C. Cancio
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 126-144; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020011 - 5 May 2024
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Abstract
Burns are inevitable in modern warfare and have comprised between 5% and 20% of battlefield injuries. Involvement of the hands is the leading cause of postburn functional impairment. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance on aspects of care necessary for [...] Read more.
Burns are inevitable in modern warfare and have comprised between 5% and 20% of battlefield injuries. Involvement of the hands is the leading cause of postburn functional impairment. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance on aspects of care necessary for the management of complex hand burns in a battlefield setting. Proper assessment and establishment of a comprehensive plan of care at the onset of injury help to ensure optimal functional outcomes in hand function. Basic treatment principles for the acutely burned hand include edema management; early wound coverage, including excision of the burn and skin grafting; early and aggressive hand therapy; and burn-scar contracture mitigation strategies. Full article
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10 pages, 400 KiB  
Article
Factors Associated with Self-Reported Voice Change in the Hospitalized Burn Population: A Burn Model System National Database Study
by Kaitlyn L. Chacon, Edward Santos, Kara McMullen, Lauren J. Shepler, Carla Tierney-Hendricks, Audra T. Clark, Chiaka Akarichi, Haig A. Yenikomshian, Caitlin M. Orton, Colleen M. Ryan and Jeffrey C. Schneider
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 116-125; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020010 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 346
Abstract
Voice plays a prominent role in verbal communication and social interactions. Acute burn care often includes intubation, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy, which could potentially impact voice quality. However, the issue of long-term dysphonia remains underexplored. This study investigates long-term self-reported voice changes in [...] Read more.
Voice plays a prominent role in verbal communication and social interactions. Acute burn care often includes intubation, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy, which could potentially impact voice quality. However, the issue of long-term dysphonia remains underexplored. This study investigates long-term self-reported voice changes in individuals with burn injuries, focusing on the impact of acute burn care interventions. Analyzing data from a multicenter longitudinal database (2015–2023), self-reported vocal changes were examined at discharge and 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after injury. Out of 582 participants, 65 reported voice changes at 12 months. Changes were prevalent at discharge (16.4%) and persisted over 60 months (11.6–12.7%). Factors associated with voice changes included flame burn, inhalation injury, tracheostomy, outpatient speech-language pathology, head/neck burn, larger burn size, mechanical ventilation, and more ventilator days (p < 0.001). For those on a ventilator more than 21 days, 48.7% experience voice changes at 12 months and 83.3% had received a tracheostomy. The regression analysis demonstrates that individuals that were placed on a ventilator and received a tracheostomy were more likely to report a voice change at 12 months. This study emphasizes the need to understand the long-term voice effects of intubation and tracheostomy in burn care. Full article
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12 pages, 1216 KiB  
Article
Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Decrease Coagulopathy Incidence in Severe Burn Patients
by Lyndon Huang, Kassandra Corona, Kendall Wermine, Elvia Villarreal, Giovanna De La Tejera, Phillip Howard Keys, Alen Palackic, Amina El Ayadi, George Golovko, Steven E. Wolf and Juquan Song
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 104-115; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020009 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 330
Abstract
The study investigated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on burn-induced coagulopathy in severely burned patients. Patients with a greater than 20% TBSA were identified in the TriNetX research network and categorized into receiving or not receiving NSAIDs in the first week [...] Read more.
The study investigated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on burn-induced coagulopathy in severely burned patients. Patients with a greater than 20% TBSA were identified in the TriNetX research network and categorized into receiving or not receiving NSAIDs in the first week after the burn. The statistical significance of the rate of burn-induced coagulopathy, mortality and sepsis in the week following injury was analysed. We observed 837 severely burned patients taking NSAIDS during the week following the burn and 1036 patients without. After matching for age, gender and race, the risk of burn-induced coagulopathy significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) in patients taking NSAIDs (17.7%) compared to those without (32.3%). Patients taking NSAIDs were also less likely to develop sepsis (p < 0.01) and thrombocytopenia (p < 0.001) or die the week following injury (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the early protective effects of NSAIDs at reducing the risk of coagulopathy as well as sepsis and mortality occur during the acute phase of burns. Full article
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14 pages, 2313 KiB  
Article
Development and Testing of the Aftercare Problem List, a Burn Aftercare Screening Instrument
by Nancy E. E. Van Loey, Elise Boersma-van Dam, Anita Boekelaar, Anneke van de Steenoven, Alette E. E. de Jong and Helma W. C. Hofland
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 90-103; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020008 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 404
Abstract
A growing interest in person-centered care from a biopsychosocial perspective has led to increased attention to structural screening. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-comprehend screening instrument using single items to identify a broad range of health-related problems in adult [...] Read more.
A growing interest in person-centered care from a biopsychosocial perspective has led to increased attention to structural screening. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-comprehend screening instrument using single items to identify a broad range of health-related problems in adult burn survivors. This study builds on earlier work regarding content generation. Focus groups and expert meetings with healthcare providers informed content refinement, resulting in the Aftercare Problem List (APL). The instrument consists of 43 items divided into nine health domains: scars, daily life functioning, scars treatment, body perceptions, stigmatization, intimacy, mental health, relationships, financial concerns, and a positive coping domain. The APL also includes a Distress Thermometer and a question inquiring about preference to discuss the results with a healthcare provider. Subsequently, the APL was completed by 102 outpatients. To test face validity, a linear regression analysis showed that problems in three health domains, i.e., scars, mental health, and body perceptions, were significantly related to higher distress. Qualitative results revealed that a minority found the items difficult which led to further adjustment of the wording and the addition of illustrations. In summation, this study subscribes to the validity of using single items to screen for burn-related problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)
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13 pages, 714 KiB  
Article
Parental Stress and Child Quality of Life after Pediatric Burn
by Dinithi Atapattu, Victoria M. Shoesmith, Fiona M. Wood and Lisa J. Martin
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 77-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020007 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 477
Abstract
Parents’ emotions after their child’s burn might be influenced by the injury circumstances or demographic characteristics of the patient and family. Parents’ post-traumatic stress symptoms and their child’s distress may interact and affect emotional states. The psychosocial outcomes of parents were measured using [...] Read more.
Parents’ emotions after their child’s burn might be influenced by the injury circumstances or demographic characteristics of the patient and family. Parents’ post-traumatic stress symptoms and their child’s distress may interact and affect emotional states. The psychosocial outcomes of parents were measured using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the CARe Burn Scale, and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Brief. The psychosocial quality of life outcomes of the pediatric burn patients were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between patient psychosocial quality of life and the related parent scores. A total of 48 patients and parents participated, with 36 giving full data at 12 months. Parental post-traumatic stress symptoms were initially high, settling by six months, although outliers remained. Parents reported higher IESR scores if their child was female, if they felt helpless at the time of the incident, and if a language other than English was spoken in the home. Parents’ scores of their child’s psychosocial function were similar to their child’s self-scores. Parents who perceived poorer emotional functioning in their child reported higher IESR scores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)
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11 pages, 270 KiB  
Review
Extracorporeal Organ Support for Burn-Injured Patients
by Garrett W. Britton, Amanda R. Keith, Barret J. Halgas, Joshua M. Boster, Nicholas S. Niazi, Kevin K. Chung and Leopoldo C. Cancio
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 66-76; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020006 - 25 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1078
Abstract
As mortality relating to severe acute burn injury improves, patients are surviving longer into the critical care phase, which is commonly complicated by multisystem organ failure. Extracorporeal organ support (ECOS) represents a set of potential therapeutic technologies for managing patients with organ-specific complications. [...] Read more.
As mortality relating to severe acute burn injury improves, patients are surviving longer into the critical care phase, which is commonly complicated by multisystem organ failure. Extracorporeal organ support (ECOS) represents a set of potential therapeutic technologies for managing patients with organ-specific complications. This article provides a comprehensive review of the existing literature, focusing on the use of continuous kidney replacement therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal, and extracorporeal blood purification. Though promising, many of these technologies are in the early phases of implementation and are restricted to well-resourced medical systems, limiting their use in large scale casualty and austere scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burn Injuries Associated with Wars and Disasters)
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