Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries

A special issue of European Burn Journal (ISSN 2673-1991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3569

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Burn Center, Rode Kruis Ziekenhuis, 1942 LE Beverwijk, The Netherlands
Interests: person centred pain free wound care; pain; nursing

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: clinical psychology; psychosocial aspects of burns; family centered care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to enhance the knowledge on and practical applications of person-centered and family-centered burn care. This Special Issue aims to draw attention to research and clinical approaches or interventions that contribute to the knowledge and clinical practice associated with person-centered care and family-centered care for patients with burns and their relatives. Studies related to nursing, wound care, pain, psychological wellbeing, and quality of life are encouraged. Research articles, reviews, and commentaries are all welcome.

Dr. Alette de Jong
Dr. Nancy Van Loey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Burn Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 971 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • person-centered care
  • family-centered care
  • wound care
  • psychosocial
  • psychological
  • coping
  • pain
  • nursing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 167 KiB  
Editorial
Person and Family Centredness—The Need for Clarity of Focus
by Brendan McCormack
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 166-168; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020014 - 27 May 2024
Viewed by 455
Abstract
Congratulations to the editorial team of the European Burn Journal for having the vision to host a Special Issue on the theme of “Person-Centred and Family-Centred Care Following Burn Injuries” [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

14 pages, 2313 KiB  
Article
Development and Testing of the Aftercare Problem List, a Burn Aftercare Screening Instrument
by Nancy E. E. Van Loey, Elise Boersma-van Dam, Anita Boekelaar, Anneke van de Steenoven, Alette E. E. de Jong and Helma W. C. Hofland
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 90-103; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020008 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 478
Abstract
A growing interest in person-centered care from a biopsychosocial perspective has led to increased attention to structural screening. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-comprehend screening instrument using single items to identify a broad range of health-related problems in adult [...] Read more.
A growing interest in person-centered care from a biopsychosocial perspective has led to increased attention to structural screening. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-comprehend screening instrument using single items to identify a broad range of health-related problems in adult burn survivors. This study builds on earlier work regarding content generation. Focus groups and expert meetings with healthcare providers informed content refinement, resulting in the Aftercare Problem List (APL). The instrument consists of 43 items divided into nine health domains: scars, daily life functioning, scars treatment, body perceptions, stigmatization, intimacy, mental health, relationships, financial concerns, and a positive coping domain. The APL also includes a Distress Thermometer and a question inquiring about preference to discuss the results with a healthcare provider. Subsequently, the APL was completed by 102 outpatients. To test face validity, a linear regression analysis showed that problems in three health domains, i.e., scars, mental health, and body perceptions, were significantly related to higher distress. Qualitative results revealed that a minority found the items difficult which led to further adjustment of the wording and the addition of illustrations. In summation, this study subscribes to the validity of using single items to screen for burn-related problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)
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13 pages, 714 KiB  
Article
Parental Stress and Child Quality of Life after Pediatric Burn
by Dinithi Atapattu, Victoria M. Shoesmith, Fiona M. Wood and Lisa J. Martin
Eur. Burn J. 2024, 5(2), 77-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj5020007 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 543
Abstract
Parents’ emotions after their child’s burn might be influenced by the injury circumstances or demographic characteristics of the patient and family. Parents’ post-traumatic stress symptoms and their child’s distress may interact and affect emotional states. The psychosocial outcomes of parents were measured using [...] Read more.
Parents’ emotions after their child’s burn might be influenced by the injury circumstances or demographic characteristics of the patient and family. Parents’ post-traumatic stress symptoms and their child’s distress may interact and affect emotional states. The psychosocial outcomes of parents were measured using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the CARe Burn Scale, and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Brief. The psychosocial quality of life outcomes of the pediatric burn patients were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between patient psychosocial quality of life and the related parent scores. A total of 48 patients and parents participated, with 36 giving full data at 12 months. Parental post-traumatic stress symptoms were initially high, settling by six months, although outliers remained. Parents reported higher IESR scores if their child was female, if they felt helpless at the time of the incident, and if a language other than English was spoken in the home. Parents’ scores of their child’s psychosocial function were similar to their child’s self-scores. Parents who perceived poorer emotional functioning in their child reported higher IESR scores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)
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12 pages, 953 KiB  
Article
Developing a Burn-Specific Family-Centered Care (BS-FCC) Framework: A Multi-Method Study
by Jonathan Bayuo and Anita Eseenam Agbeko
Eur. Burn J. 2023, 4(3), 280-291; https://doi.org/10.3390/ebj4030025 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
A burn has been described as a family injury warranting the delivery of family-centered care (FCC) across the continuum of burns management. This assertion notwithstanding, only limited progress has been made to develop and implement FCC interventions in the burn unit. As a [...] Read more.
A burn has been described as a family injury warranting the delivery of family-centered care (FCC) across the continuum of burns management. This assertion notwithstanding, only limited progress has been made to develop and implement FCC interventions in the burn unit. As a starting point, this study sought to formulate a tentative framework to underpin FCC in burn care. A multi-method design comprising an umbrella review and the secondary data analysis of qualitative datasets was employed. Following these, the findings were merged and aligned to the Universal Model of FCC to formulate the burn-specific FCC framework. For the umbrella review, four review articles met the criteria for inclusion. Following a data synthesis of the review findings and their integration with the qualitative dataset, four meta-themes that encapsulate the shared needs/concerns of family members of both pediatric and adult burn survivors emerged: (1) psychosocial concerns, (2) issues relating to role changes, (3) logistical concerns, and (4) requiring information. These issues were mapped to the following components of the Universal Model of FCC: family support, education, collaboration, and communication. All these are underpinned by dedicated policies, procedures, and consideration of the family context. Testing and further empirical work are needed to refine and implement the framework across the continuum of burn management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centered and Family-Centered Care Following Burn Injuries)
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