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Article

Thermal and Mineral Sensitivity of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilised using Lentil Proteins

1
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, T12 Y337 Cork, Ireland
2
Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging, Giggenhauser Str. 35, 85354 Freising, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(4), 453; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040453
Received: 24 February 2020 / Revised: 31 March 2020 / Accepted: 1 April 2020 / Published: 8 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk Alternatives and Non-Dairy Fermented Products)
Oil-in-water emulsion systems formulated with plant proteins are of increasing interest to food researchers and industry due to benefits associated with cost-effectiveness, sustainability and animal well-being. The aim of this study was to understand how the stability of complex model emulsions formulated using lentil proteins are influenced by calcium fortification (0 to 10 mM CaCl2) and thermal processing (95 or 140 °C). A valve homogeniser, operating at first and second stage pressures of 15 and 3 MPa, was used to prepare emulsions. On heating at 140 °C, the heat coagulation time (pH 6.8) for the emulsions was successively reduced from 4.80 to 0.40 min with increasing CaCl2 concentration from 0 to 10 mM, respectively. Correspondingly, the sample with the highest CaCl2 addition level developed the highest viscosity during heating (95 °C × 30 s), reaching a final value of 163 mPa·s. This was attributed to calcium-mediated interactions of lentil proteins, as confirmed by the increase in the mean particle diameter (D[4,3]) to 36.5 µm for the sample with 6 mM CaCl2, compared to the unheated and heated control with D[4,3] values of 0.75 and 0.68 µm, respectively. This study demonstrated that the combination of calcium and heat promoted the aggregation of lentil proteins in concentrated emulsions. View Full-Text
Keywords: lentil proteins; emulsion; mineral fortification; calcium; heat stability. lentil proteins; emulsion; mineral fortification; calcium; heat stability.
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alonso-Miravalles, L.; Zannini, E.; Bez, J.; Arendt, E.K.; O’Mahony, J.A. Thermal and Mineral Sensitivity of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilised using Lentil Proteins. Foods 2020, 9, 453. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040453

AMA Style

Alonso-Miravalles L, Zannini E, Bez J, Arendt EK, O’Mahony JA. Thermal and Mineral Sensitivity of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilised using Lentil Proteins. Foods. 2020; 9(4):453. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040453

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alonso-Miravalles, Loreto, Emanuele Zannini, Juergen Bez, Elke K. Arendt, and James A. O’Mahony. 2020. "Thermal and Mineral Sensitivity of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilised using Lentil Proteins" Foods 9, no. 4: 453. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040453

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