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Open AccessArticle

Nutrient Composition of Popularly Consumed African and Caribbean Foods in The UK

1
School of Clinical & Applied Sciences, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS1 3HE, UK
2
School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS6 3QQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(10), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100500
Received: 27 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 11 October 2019 / Published: 15 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Promoting Effects of Traditional Foods)
(1) Background: Traditional foods are important in the diets of Black Africans and Caribbeans and, more widely, influence UK food culture. However, little is known about the nutritional status of these ethnic groups and the nutrient composition of their traditional foods. The aim was to identify and analyse African and Caribbean dishes, snacks and beverages popularly consumed in the UK for energy, macronutrients and micronutrients. (2) Methods: Various approaches including focus group discussions and 24-h dietary recalls were used to identify traditional dishes, snacks, and beverages. Defined criteria were used to prioritise and prepare 33 composite samples for nutrient analysis in a UK accredited laboratory. Quality assurance procedures and data verification were undertaken to ensure inclusion in the UK nutrient database. (3) Results: Energy content ranged from 60 kcal in Malta drink to 619 kcal in the shito sauce. Sucrose levels did not exceed the UK recommendation for adults and children. Most of the dishes contained negligible levels of trans fatty acid. The most abundant minerals were Na, K, Ca, Cu, Mn and Se whereas Mg, P, Fe and Zn were present in small amounts. (4) Conclusion: There was wide variation in the energy, macro- and micronutrients composition of the foods analysed. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrients; food composition; African; Caribbean; macronutrients; energy; vitamins and minerals nutrients; food composition; African; Caribbean; macronutrients; energy; vitamins and minerals
MDPI and ACS Style

Apekey, T.A.; Copeman, J.; Kime, N.H.; Tashani, O.A.; Kittaneh, M.; Walsh, D.; Maynard, M.J. Nutrient Composition of Popularly Consumed African and Caribbean Foods in The UK. Foods 2019, 8, 500.

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