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Scientia Pharmaceutica is published by MDPI from Volume 84 Issue 3 (2016). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Austrian Pharmaceutical Society (Österreichische Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft, ÖPhG).

Table of Contents

Sci. Pharm., Volume 71, Issue 3 (September 2003) , Pages 151-259

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Open AccessArticle
Medicinal used plants from India: analysis of the essential oils of Sphaeranthus indicus flowers, roots and stems with leaves
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 251-259; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-23
Received: 3 January 2003 / Revised: 22 June 2003 / Accepted: 22 June 2003 / Published: 10 September 2003
Viewed by 260 | PDF Full-text (2755 KB)
Abstract
The essential oils of flowers, roots and herb (stems with leaves) of Sphaeranthus indicus Kurz. (Asteraceae) from southern India were investigated by gas chromatographic-spectroscopic (GC-FID and GC-MS) and olfactoric methods to identify those compounds responsible for the characteristic odor as well as partly [...] Read more.
The essential oils of flowers, roots and herb (stems with leaves) of Sphaeranthus indicus Kurz. (Asteraceae) from southern India were investigated by gas chromatographic-spectroscopic (GC-FID and GC-MS) and olfactoric methods to identify those compounds responsible for the characteristic odor as well as partly for the folk medicinal use of this plant. More than 95 volatiles were found to be constituents of the three essential S. indicus oils with following composition of main components: flower oil: β-eudesmol (21.4%), 2,5-dimethoxy-p-cymene (16.2%), β-caryophyllene (7.8%), τ-cadinol (7.2%). caryophyllene oxide (6.9%) and α-eudesmol (4.5%); root oil: 2,5-dimethoxy-pcymene (28.3%), τ-cadinol (25.3%), (2)-arteannuic alcohol (10.1 %), β-maaliene (3.9%) and caryophyllene oxide (3.1%); herb oil: 2,5-dimethoxy-p-cymene (27.0%), τ-cadinol (12.5%), β-eudesmol (9.1 %), α-eudesmol (7.0%) and caroyphyllene oxide (4.7%). In addition, the odor impressions of the samples are described and the possible use of the essential Sphaeranthus indicus oils in medicinal, cosmetic and food flavoring discussed. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Method Development for Separation of Active Ingredients in Cold Medicines by Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 235-250; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-22
Received: 20 November 2002 / Revised: 6 February 2003 / Accepted: 6 February 2003 / Published: 5 August 2003
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 231 | PDF Full-text (4406 KB)
Abstract
Separation of nine commonly used active ingredients in cold medicines, were demonstrated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The ingredients included paracetamol, chlorpheniramine maleate, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, triprolidine hydrochloride, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, dextromethorphan hydrobromide, loratadine, aspirin and caffeine. Effects of buffer concentrations, pH, organic modifiers and capillary [...] Read more.
Separation of nine commonly used active ingredients in cold medicines, were demonstrated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The ingredients included paracetamol, chlorpheniramine maleate, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, triprolidine hydrochloride, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, dextromethorphan hydrobromide, loratadine, aspirin and caffeine. Effects of buffer concentrations, pH, organic modifiers and capillary length were investigated. The optimum conditions were achieved in 10 mM sodium dihydrogenphosphate-sodium tetraborate buffer, pH 9.0, containing 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate and 28% v/v acetonitrile using the effective length of 50 cm, the separating voltage of +15 kV and the capillary temperature of 30°C. Separation of all peaks was obtained within 28.4 min with a resolution of 1.2. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Contribution to the Analysis of the Volatile Constituents from some Lavender and Lavandin Cultivars Grown in Greece
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 229-234; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-21
Received: 2 June 2003 / Revised: 12 June 2003 / Accepted: 12 June 2003 / Published: 1 August 2003
Viewed by 286 | PDF Full-text (2321 KB)
Abstract
The essential oils of Lavandula angustifolia and the Lavandin hybrids "super" and "special" grown in Greece, were studied in order to evaluate their quality as far as the correlation of their essential oil composition. The essential oil yields were [...] Read more.
The essential oils of Lavandula angustifolia and the Lavandin hybrids "super" and "special" grown in Greece, were studied in order to evaluate their quality as far as the correlation of their essential oil composition. The essential oil yields were determined to 4.4%, 7.5% and 8.5% in the lavandula and lavandin "super" and "special" hybrids respectively. Fifty-nine constituents were identiiied representing the 99% of the oils. The qualitative analysis of the oils was carried out by GCIMS and revealed that linalool and linalylacetate were the predominant constituents. Remarkable differences were noticed between the camphor percentages among them (11.35% and 5.03% for the "super " and "special" respectively). Full article
Open AccessArticle
Spectrophotometric Determination of Cefepime Hydrochloride, Cefoperazone Sodium, Ceftazidime Pentahydrate. Cefuroxime Sodium and Etamsylate Using Ammonium Molybdate
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 211-228; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-20
Received: 5 March 2003 / Revised: 21 May 2003 / Accepted: 21 May 2003 / Published: 20 July 2003
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 338 | PDF Full-text (5868 KB)
Abstract
A simple, rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the quantitative determination of five drugs of pharmaceutical interest; cefepime HCI , cefoperazone Na , ceftazidime pentahydrate , cefuroxime Na and etamsylate in pure form as well as in pharmaceuticals. The method [...] Read more.
A simple, rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the quantitative determination of five drugs of pharmaceutical interest; cefepime HCI , cefoperazone Na , ceftazidime pentahydrate , cefuroxime Na and etamsylate in pure form as well as in pharmaceuticals. The method is based on the reduction of the chromogenic agent , ammonium molybdate (Mo6+), to molybdenum blue (Mo5+) by the examined drugs in sulphuric acid medium and by aid of heating in boiling water bath. The resulting "blue coloured" product possess a characteristic λmax at 695-716 nm. Beers law is obeyed over the concentration range of 2-70 μg ml-1 with molar absorpitivities ranging from 2.704×10-3–24.14×10-3 L.mol-1.cm-1 and Sandell sensitivities ranging from 1.03x10-3–5.4x10-3 μg cm-2. The proposed method has been applied successfully for the determination of the examined drugs both in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method are comparable with those of the reported methods . Full article
Open AccessArticle
Adamantam Derivatives, Part 111* : Synthesis of Some Aminoadamantanes as Novel Antitumor Agents
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 195-209; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-19
Received: 8 January 2003 / Revised: 28 April 2003 / Accepted: 28 April 2003 / Published: 15 July 2003
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 326 | PDF Full-text (4524 KB)
Abstract
New series of 1-(1-adamantyl)semicarbazide 3a, 1-(1-adamantyl)4(4-subsMuted pheny1)semicarbazides 3b-e, 1-(1-adamantyl)-3-(subsMuted aminosulfonyl)ureas 5a-g, 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylamino-methylene)-semicarbazide 7, 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylcarbonylmethyl)semicarbazide 8, 1-(Iadamantyl)-4-acylsemicarbazides Sad and 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylaminocarbonyl) thiosemicarbazide 10 have been synthesized and tested for their anMumor activity. Among them, compounds 3a [...] Read more.
New series of 1-(1-adamantyl)semicarbazide 3a, 1-(1-adamantyl)4(4-subsMuted pheny1)semicarbazides 3b-e, 1-(1-adamantyl)-3-(subsMuted aminosulfonyl)ureas 5a-g, 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylamino-methylene)-semicarbazide 7, 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylcarbonylmethyl)semicarbazide 8, 1-(Iadamantyl)-4-acylsemicarbazides Sad and 1-(1-adamantyl)-4-(1-adamantylaminocarbonyl) thiosemicarbazide 10 have been synthesized and tested for their anMumor activity. Among them, compounds 3a, 5a, 9a. and 9d exhibited a broad spectrum antitumor activity with full panel (MG-MID) median growth inhibition (GI50) of 1 0.5, 12.0, 6.8 and 5.5 μM respectively. In addition, compounds 3a, 3c, and 5d proved to be of moderate selectivity toward leukemia cell lines wrth ratios of 3.0, 3.9 and 4.0 respectively. Moreover, compounds 5a and 5g showed moderate selectivrty toward melanoma cell lines with ratios of 3.6 and 4.4 respectively. The detailed synthesis, specroscopic and biological data are reported. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Utility of Certain π-Acceptors for the Spectrophotometric Determination of Hydralazine Hydrochloride
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 179-194; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-18
Received: 12 March 2003 / Revised: 2 June 2003 / Accepted: 2 June 2003 / Published: 10 July 2003
Viewed by 253 | PDF Full-text (4861 KB)
Abstract
The interaction of hydralazine hydrochloride with picric acid (I), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) (II), 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (III), bromanil (IV) and chloranil (V) was found to be useful for its spectrophotometric determination. The determination was carried out at 520, 510, 550, 540 and 535 nm for [...] Read more.
The interaction of hydralazine hydrochloride with picric acid (I), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) (II), 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (III), bromanil (IV) and chloranil (V) was found to be useful for its spectrophotometric determination. The determination was carried out at 520, 510, 550, 540 and 535 nm for the reaction with (I), (II), (III), (IV) and (V), respectively. The effect of several variables on the colouring process was studied. The proposed methods have been applied successfully for the determination of hydralazine hydrochloride in pure samples and in pharmaceutical preparations with good accuracy and precision. The results were compared to those obtained by the official and pharmacopoeia1 methods. The linear ranges for obedience of Beer's law are up to 118, 54,639, 27.5 and 78.6 mg/l, Ringbom ranges are 13-100, 7.6-44.7, 77.4-445.0, 5.8-25.8 and 22.5-63.1 μg/ml, Detection limits are 4.8, 2.2, 18.4, 1.2 and 5.9 mg/l, and RSD 0.042, 0.037, 0.043, 0.013 and 0.073 for reactions of hydralazine hydrochloride with I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Development and In Vitro Evaluation of a Mucoadhesive Oral Deliverv System for Antisense Oliaonucleotides
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 165-177; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-17
Received: 26 May 2003 / Revised: 24 June 2003 / Accepted: 24 June 2003 / Published: 1 July 2003
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 249 | PDF Full-text (4107 KB)
Abstract
It was the aim of this study to develop an oral phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (PS-ODN) drug delivery system and to evaluate its properties in vitro. Results demonstrated that the 16-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide used was completely stable towards enzymatic degradation by secreted and membrane bound [...] Read more.
It was the aim of this study to develop an oral phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (PS-ODN) drug delivery system and to evaluate its properties in vitro. Results demonstrated that the 16-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide used was completely stable towards enzymatic degradation by secreted and membrane bound intestinal enzymes. Permeation studies with freshly excised intestinal mucosa showed a comparatively high uptake of the PS-ODN with an apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of 8.35 ± 1.24 x 10-6 cm/sec. The PS-ODN was incorporated in a poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine carrier matrix system exhibiting high cohesive and mucoadhesive properties. Release studies demonstrated that a controlled and sustained PS-ODN release out of this delivery system could be achieved. Because of these features, the dosage form developed within this study seems to represent a promising novel tool for oral PS-ODN delivery. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Mass uniformity of nasal sprays
Sci. Pharm. 2003, 71(3), 151-164; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-03-16
Received: 5 June 2003 / Revised: 23 June 2003 / Accepted: 23 June 2003 / Published: 28 June 2003
Viewed by 286 | PDF Full-text (4153 KB)
Abstract
The uniformity of nasal spray dose delivery was investigated. Four selected nasal sprays commercially available on the European market were checked for their mass uniformity according to the guidelines of the European Pharmacopoeia and recent draft guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration [...] Read more.
The uniformity of nasal spray dose delivery was investigated. Four selected nasal sprays commercially available on the European market were checked for their mass uniformity according to the guidelines of the European Pharmacopoeia and recent draft guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Mass uniformity was also determined with simulation of a patient's use daily, and at 3- and 7- day intervals. The influence of the degree of filling and different storage positions on mass uniformity were also investigated. At first usage, all preparations fulfilled the specifications of the Ph.Eur. and the FDA draft guidelines. When patient application was simulated, however, the dose accuracy decreased significantly with some of the preparations with increasing time of non-usage, presumably due to evaporation of liquid in the application system. This is indicated by a loss of weight of the nasal spray flasks observed during simulated weekly usage. Under these conditions (6 days' storage without use, same demands for uniformity of mass of the delivered dose), one of the preparations even failed to meet the Ph.Eur. and FDA limits. Full article
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