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Lipidomics to Assess Omega 3 Bioactivity
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Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe Research Centre, Lacombe T4L 1W1, AB, Canada
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Josera GmbH & Co. KG, Kleinheubach 63924, Germany
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Department of Animal Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa
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Prairie Swine Centre, Inc., Saskatoon S7H 3J8, SK, Canada
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Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2R3, AB, Canada
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Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3150, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Lindsay Brown, Bernhard Rauch and Hemant Poudyal
J. Clin. Med. 2015, 4(12), 1999-2011; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm4121956
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 8 December 2015 / Accepted: 8 December 2015 / Published: 16 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Health and Disease)
Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, but typical feeding practices give it a high omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid ratio and make it a poor source of n-3 fatty acids. Feeding pigs n-3 fatty acids can increase their contents in pork, and in countries where label claims are permitted, claims can be met with limited feeding of n-3 fatty acid enrich feedstuffs, provided contributions of both fat and muscle are included in pork servings. Pork enriched with n-3 fatty acids is, however, not widely available. Producing and marketing n-3 fatty acid enriched pork requires regulatory approval, development costs, quality control costs, may increase production costs, and enriched pork has to be tracked to retail and sold for a premium. Mandatory labelling of the n-6/n-3 ratio and the n-3 fatty acid content of pork may help drive production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork, and open the door to population-based disease prevention polices (i.e., food tax to provide incentives to improve production practices). A shift from the status-quo, however, will require stronger signals along the value chain indicating production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork is an industry priority. View Full-Text
Keywords: pig; pork; n-3; omega-3; LNA; ETA; EPA; DHA pig; pork; n-3; omega-3; LNA; ETA; EPA; DHA
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Dugan, M.E.; Vahmani, P.; Turner, T.D.; Mapiye, C.; Juárez, M.; Prieto, N.; Beaulieu, A.D.; Zijlstra, R.T.; Patience, J.F.; Aalhus, J.L. Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids. J. Clin. Med. 2015, 4, 1999-2011.

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