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Membranes, Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2015) – 6 articles , Pages 150-252

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Review
Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 228-252; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020228 - 23 Jun 2015
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3458
Abstract
In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs [...] Read more.
In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
Article
Free Volume and Gas Permeation in Anthracene Maleimide-Based Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 214-227; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020214 - 28 May 2015
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 5250
Abstract
High free-volume copolymers were prepared via polycondensation with 2,3,5,6,-tetrafluoroterephthalonitrile (TFTPN) in which a portion of the 3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-1,1'-spirobisindane (TTSBI) of PIM-1 was replaced with dibutyl anthracene maleimide (4bIII). An investigation of free volume using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), and gas permeation measurements was [...] Read more.
High free-volume copolymers were prepared via polycondensation with 2,3,5,6,-tetrafluoroterephthalonitrile (TFTPN) in which a portion of the 3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-1,1'-spirobisindane (TTSBI) of PIM-1 was replaced with dibutyl anthracene maleimide (4bIII). An investigation of free volume using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), and gas permeation measurements was carried out for the thin film composite copolymer membranes and compared to PIM-1. The average free volume hole size and the gas permeance of the copolymer membranes increased with decreasing TTSBI content in the copolymer. Full article
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Article
Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 197-213; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020197 - 12 May 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2859
Abstract
The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation [...] Read more.
The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
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Review
Asymmetric Lipid Membranes: Towards More Realistic Model Systems
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 180-196; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020180 - 06 May 2015
Cited by 120 | Viewed by 7687
Abstract
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and [...] Read more.
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Structure and Dynamics)
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Article
A New Emulsion Liquid Membrane Based on a Palm Oil for the Extraction of Heavy Metals
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 168-179; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020168 - 23 Apr 2015
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 6971
Abstract
The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic [...] Read more.
The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic diluent such as palm oil. The membrane phase so formulated includes the mobile carrier tri-n-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC), to facilitate the metal transport, and the hydrophilic surfactant Tween 80 to facilitate the dispersion of the ELM phase in the aqueous solution. Span 80 is used as surfactant and butanol as co-surfactant. Our results demonstrate that this novel ELM formulation, using the vegetable palm oil as diluent, is useful for the removal of hexavalent chromium with an efficiency of over 99% and is thus competitive with the already existing, yet less environmentally friendly, ELM formulations. This result was achieved with an optimal concentration of 0.1 M NaOH as stripping agent and an external phase pH of 0.5. Different water qualities have also been investigated showing that the type of water (deionized, distilled, or tap water) does not significantly influence the extraction rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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Review
Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 150-167; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020150 - 27 Mar 2015
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3766
Abstract
Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and [...] Read more.
Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs) look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s) plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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