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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Mapping and Analyzing the Evolution of the Butangbunasi Landslide Using Landsat Time Series with Respect to Heavy Rainfall Events during Typhoons

1
Department of Geoinformatics—Z_GIS, University of Salzburg, Schillerstrasse 30, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
2
Department of Geography and Geology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
3
Centre for Interdisciplinary Mountain Research, University of Lausanne, Chemin de’l Institut, 1967 Bramois, Switzerland
4
Disaster Prevention Education Center, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020630
Received: 10 December 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2020 / Accepted: 13 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mapping and Monitoring of Geohazards)
Large rainfall-induced landslides are among the most dangerous natural hazards in Taiwan, posing a risk for people and infrastructure. Thus, better knowledge about the evolution of landslides and their impact on the downstream area is of high importance for disaster mitigation. The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to semi-automatically map the evolution of the Butangbunasi landslide in south-central Taiwan using satellite remote sensing data, and (2) to investigate the potential correlation between changes in landslide area and heavy rainfall during typhoon events. Landslide area, as well as temporary landslide-dammed lakes, were semi-automatically identified using object-based image analysis (OBIA), based on 20 Landsat images from 1984 to 2018. Hourly rainfall data from the Taiwan Central Weather Bureau (CWB) was complemented with rainfall data from Climate Hazards Group Infrared Precipitation with Station data (CHIRPS) to examine the potential relationship between landslide area changes and rainfall as a triggering factor. The OBIA mapping results revealed that the most significant landslide extension happened after typhoon Morakot in 2009. We found a moderate positive relationship between the landslide area change and the duration of the heavy rainfall event, whereas daily precipitation, cumulative rainfall and mean intensity did not present strong significant correlations.
Keywords: landslide; remote sensing; Landsat; object-based image analysis (OBIA); time series; heavy rainfall; rainfall data; typhoon; landslide-dammed lake; Taiwan landslide; remote sensing; Landsat; object-based image analysis (OBIA); time series; heavy rainfall; rainfall data; typhoon; landslide-dammed lake; Taiwan
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hölbling, D.; Abad, L.; Dabiri, Z.; Prasicek, G.; Tsai, T.-T.; Argentin, A.-L. Mapping and Analyzing the Evolution of the Butangbunasi Landslide Using Landsat Time Series with Respect to Heavy Rainfall Events during Typhoons. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 630.

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