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Humanities 2018, 7(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040091

Recognizing the Delians Displaced after 167/6 BCE

1
History Section, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
2
Department of the Classics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
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Abstract

In 167/6 BCE, the Roman senate granted a request from Athens to control the island of Delos. Subsequently, the Delians inhabiting the island were mandated to leave and an Athenian community was installed. Polybius, who records these events, tells us that the Delians left and resettled in Achaea in the Peloponnese. Scholars have tended to focus on Rome’s motivations for siding with the Athenians rather than on what happened to the Delians. Furthermore, translations have tended to use the broad terminology of ‘migration’ to describe the Delians’ movement. Comparatively, this contribution suggests that modern categories connected to ‘displacement’ can help us recover aspects of the Delians’ experience. Particularly, a shift to the vocabulary of ‘displacement’ highlights the creative agency of the Delians in holding the Athenians accountable for their expulsion and in seeking recognition from Rome of their integration into the Achaean state. The application of these modern categories necessitates reflection on differences in the political, institutional landscapes that have shaped the experience of displacement in the ancient Hellenistic and modern contexts, as well as on variations in experience amongst the Delians. Ultimately, recognizing what these individuals experienced within the evolving third-party arbitration system of the ancient world leads us to think about the indirect violence of expanding political institutions in ‘globalising’ worlds, both ancient and modern. View Full-Text
Keywords: Delos; Delians; koinon of the Achaeans; Athens; Roman senate; Polybius; Hellenistic Mediterranean; third-party arbitration; international humanitarian organizations; migration; displacement; refugee; indirect violence; globalisation Delos; Delians; koinon of the Achaeans; Athens; Roman senate; Polybius; Hellenistic Mediterranean; third-party arbitration; international humanitarian organizations; migration; displacement; refugee; indirect violence; globalisation
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Gettel, E. Recognizing the Delians Displaced after 167/6 BCE. Humanities 2018, 7, 91.

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