Next Article in Journal
A Remote-Controlled Robotic System with Safety Protection Strategy Based on Force-Sensing and Bending Feedback for Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization
Next Article in Special Issue
Electrochemical Performance of Micropillar Array Electrodes in Microflows
Previous Article in Journal
External Disturbances Rejection for Vector Field Sensors in Attitude and Heading Reference Systems
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mechanical Rupture-Based Antibacterial and Cell-Compatible ZnO/SiO2 Nanowire Structures Formed by Bottom-Up Approaches
Article

A Simple Low-Temperature Glass Bonding Process with Surface Activation by Oxygen Plasma for Micro/Nanofluidic Devices

Department of System Design Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku, Kanagawa 223-8522, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Micromachines 2020, 11(9), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11090804
Received: 9 June 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 23 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanofluidics)
The bonding of glass substrates is necessary when constructing micro/nanofluidic devices for sealing micro- and nanochannels. Recently, a low-temperature glass bonding method utilizing surface activation with plasma was developed to realize micro/nanofluidic devices for various applications, but it still has issues for general use. Here, we propose a simple process of low-temperature glass bonding utilizing typical facilities available in clean rooms and applied it to the fabrication of micro/nanofluidic devices made of different glasses. In the process, the substrate surface was activated with oxygen plasma, and the glass substrates were placed in contact in a class ISO 5 clean room. The pre-bonded substrates were heated for annealing. We found an optimal concentration of oxygen plasma and achieved a bonding energy of 0.33–0.48 J/m2 in fused-silica/fused-silica glass bonding. The process was applied to the bonding of fused-silica glass and borosilicate glass, which is generally used in optical microscopy, and revealed higher bonding energy than fused-silica/fused-silica glass bonding. An annealing temperature lower than 200 °C was necessary to avoid crack generation by thermal stress due to the different thermal properties of the glasses. A fabricated micro/nanofluidic device exhibited a pressure resistance higher than 600 kPa. This work will contribute to the advancement of micro/nanofluidics. View Full-Text
Keywords: microfluidics; nanofluidics; fabrication; bonding; glass microfluidics; nanofluidics; fabrication; bonding; glass
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Shoda, K.; Tanaka, M.; Mino, K.; Kazoe, Y. A Simple Low-Temperature Glass Bonding Process with Surface Activation by Oxygen Plasma for Micro/Nanofluidic Devices. Micromachines 2020, 11, 804. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11090804

AMA Style

Shoda K, Tanaka M, Mino K, Kazoe Y. A Simple Low-Temperature Glass Bonding Process with Surface Activation by Oxygen Plasma for Micro/Nanofluidic Devices. Micromachines. 2020; 11(9):804. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11090804

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shoda, Koki, Minori Tanaka, Kensuke Mino, and Yutaka Kazoe. 2020. "A Simple Low-Temperature Glass Bonding Process with Surface Activation by Oxygen Plasma for Micro/Nanofluidic Devices" Micromachines 11, no. 9: 804. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11090804

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop