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Article

The Acute and Chronic Cognitive Effects of a Sage Extract: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Study in Healthy Humans

1
Brain Performance and Nutrition Research Centre, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK
2
NUTRAN, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK
3
Nexira SAS, 129 Chemin de Croisset-CS 94151, 76723 Rouen, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010218
Received: 20 November 2020 / Revised: 6 January 2021 / Accepted: 11 January 2021 / Published: 14 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements and Human Health)
The sage (Salvia) plant contains a host of terpenes and phenolics which interact with mechanisms pertinent to brain function and improve aspects of cognitive performance. However, previous studies in humans have looked at these phytochemicals in isolation and following acute consumption only. A preclinical in vivo study in rodents, however, has demonstrated improved cognitive outcomes following 2-week consumption of CogniviaTM, a proprietary extract of both Salvia officinalis polyphenols and Salvia lavandulaefolia terpenoids, suggesting that a combination of phytochemicals from sage might be more efficacious over a longer period of time. The current study investigated the impact of this sage combination on cognitive functions in humans with acute and chronic outcomes. Participants (n = 94, 25 M, 69 F, 30–60 years old) took part in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups design where a comprehensive array of cognitions were assessed 120- and 240-min post-dose acutely and following 29-day supplementation with either 600 mg of the sage combination or placebo. A consistent, significant benefit of the sage combination was observed throughout working memory and accuracy task outcome measures (specifically on the Corsi Blocks, Numeric Working Memory, and Name to Face Recall tasks) both acutely (i.e., changes within day 1 and day 29) and chronically (i.e., changes between day 1 to day 29). These results fall slightly outside of those reported previously with single Salvia administration, and therefore, a follow-up study with the single and combined extracts is required to confirm how these effects differ within the same cohort. View Full-Text
Keywords: sage; Salvia officinalis; Salvia lavandulaefolia; polyphenols; cognition sage; Salvia officinalis; Salvia lavandulaefolia; polyphenols; cognition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wightman, E.L.; Jackson, P.A.; Spittlehouse, B.; Heffernan, T.; Guillemet, D.; Kennedy, D.O. The Acute and Chronic Cognitive Effects of a Sage Extract: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Study in Healthy Humans. Nutrients 2021, 13, 218. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010218

AMA Style

Wightman EL, Jackson PA, Spittlehouse B, Heffernan T, Guillemet D, Kennedy DO. The Acute and Chronic Cognitive Effects of a Sage Extract: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Study in Healthy Humans. Nutrients. 2021; 13(1):218. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010218

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wightman, Emma L., Philippa A. Jackson, Bethany Spittlehouse, Thomas Heffernan, Damien Guillemet, and David O. Kennedy. 2021. "The Acute and Chronic Cognitive Effects of a Sage Extract: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Study in Healthy Humans" Nutrients 13, no. 1: 218. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010218

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