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Open AccessArticle

A Delayed Morning and Earlier Evening Time-Restricted Feeding Protocol for Improving Glycemic Control and Dietary Adherence in Men with Overweight/Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

1
Exercise and Nutrition Research Program, Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
2
Department of Dietetics, Nutrition and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020505
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 11 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 17 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meal Timing to Improve Human Health)
We determined the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF; 8 h/d) versus extended feeding (EXF; 15 h/d) on 24-h and postprandial metabolism and subjective opinions of TRF in men with overweight/obesity. In a randomized crossover design, 11 sedentary males (age 38 ± 5 y; BMI: 32.2 ± 2.0 kg/m2) completed two isoenergetic diet protocols for 5 days, consuming meals at 1000, 1300 and 1700 h (TRF) or 0700, 1400 and 2100 h (EXF). On Day 5, participants remained in the laboratory for 24 h, and blood samples were collected at hourly (0700–2300 h) then 2-hourly (2300–0700 h) intervals for concentrations of glucose, insulin and appetite/incretin hormones. Structured qualitative interviews were conducted following completion of both dietary conditions and investigated thematically. Total 24-h area under the curve (AUCtotal) [glucose] tended to be lower for TRF versus EXF (−5.5 ± 9.0 mmol/L/h, p = 0.09). Nocturnal glucose AUC was lower in TRF (−4.2 ± 5.8 mmol/L/h, p = 0.04), with no difference in waking glucose AUC or AUCtotal for [insulin]. Attitudes towards TRF were positive with improved feelings of well-being. Barriers to TRF were work schedules, family commitments and social events. Compared to extended feeding, short-term TRF improved nocturnal glycemic control and was positively perceived in men with overweight/obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; insulin; diet; obesity; appetite; acceptability; fasting; dietary patterns; metabolism glucose; insulin; diet; obesity; appetite; acceptability; fasting; dietary patterns; metabolism
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parr, E.B.; Devlin, B.L.; Radford, B.E.; Hawley, J.A. A Delayed Morning and Earlier Evening Time-Restricted Feeding Protocol for Improving Glycemic Control and Dietary Adherence in Men with Overweight/Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 505. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020505

AMA Style

Parr EB, Devlin BL, Radford BE, Hawley JA. A Delayed Morning and Earlier Evening Time-Restricted Feeding Protocol for Improving Glycemic Control and Dietary Adherence in Men with Overweight/Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):505. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020505

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parr, Evelyn B.; Devlin, Brooke L.; Radford, Bridget E.; Hawley, John A. 2020. "A Delayed Morning and Earlier Evening Time-Restricted Feeding Protocol for Improving Glycemic Control and Dietary Adherence in Men with Overweight/Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 505. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020505

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