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Qualified Health Claim Language affects Purchase Intentions for Green Tea Products in the United States

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-2882, USA
2
John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
3
Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8520, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040921
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 20 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Abstract

Qualified health claims (QHC) describe diet–disease relationships and summarize the quality and strength of evidence for a claim. Companies assert that QHCs increase sales and take legal action to ensure claims reflect their interests. Yet, there is no empirical evidence that QHCs influence consumers. Using green tea as a case study, this study investigated the effects of QHCs on purchase intentions among adults 55 years and older living in the US. An online survey using a between-subjects design examined QHCs about the relationship between green tea and the reduced risk of breast and/or prostate cancer or yukichi fruit juice and the reduced risk of gastrocoridalis, a fictitious relationship. QHCs written by a green tea company generated greater perceptions of evidence for the relationship, greater confidence in green tea and cancer, and increased purchase intentions for green tea than other QHCs. Factors that mitigated the claim’s effects on purchase intentions are: Race/ethnicity; age; importance of health claims; supplement use; health; worry about health/becoming sick with cancer; worry that led to dietary change; green tea consumption; and familiarity with the green tea–cancer. Consumers who made health-related dietary change in the past year and consider health claims important indicated greater purchase intentions than others. View Full-Text
Keywords: qualified health claim; older adult; green tea; cancer; purchase intentions qualified health claim; older adult; green tea; cancer; purchase intentions
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Berhaupt-Glickstein, A.; Hooker, N.H.; Hallman, W.K. Qualified Health Claim Language affects Purchase Intentions for Green Tea Products in the United States. Nutrients 2019, 11, 921.

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