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Open AccessArticle

Comparison of Dietary Micronutrient Intakes by Body Weight Status among Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic Black Women Aged 19–39 Years: An Analysis of NHANES 2003–2014

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
3
Department of Family Medicine and Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine, NorTex, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
4
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2846; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122846
Received: 14 October 2019 / Revised: 15 November 2019 / Accepted: 18 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Dietary Intake for Anthropometry and Body Mass Index)
The objective of the current study was to examine micronutrient intake from foods in women of childbearing age and to better understand potential nutritional problems varied by body weight status in minority women. A sample of women aged 19–39 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2003–2014 was analyzed. Dietary intakes of 13 micronutrients were estimated using the National Cancer Institute method. Mexican-American and non-Hispanic Black women were categorized into normal/under-weight, overweight, or obese groups according to their body mass index (BMI). Mexican-American and non-Hispanic Black women had lower dietary intakes for vitamins A, B2, B6, B12, and D, folate, calcium, and magnesium than non-Hispanic Whites. Among Mexican-Americans, obese women had the lowest dietary intake of vitamins A, B2, C and D. Obese non-Hispanic Black women had significantly lower dietary intakes of iron and zinc than their normal/under-weight counterparts. Comparable percentages (>30%) of Mexican-American and non-Hispanic Black women had dietary intake less than the Estimated Average Requirements (EARs) for several key nutrients including vitamin A, C and D, folate, calcium and magnesium, and the percentages varied by body weight status. These results indicate micronutrient inadequacies persist among and within racial/ethnic and body weight groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: micronutrient; overweight; obesity; Mexican-American; non-Hispanic Black; women micronutrient; overweight; obesity; Mexican-American; non-Hispanic Black; women
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Liu, J.; Zhu, X.; Fulda, K.G.; Chen, S.; Tao, M.-H. Comparison of Dietary Micronutrient Intakes by Body Weight Status among Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic Black Women Aged 19–39 Years: An Analysis of NHANES 2003–2014. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2846.

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