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Open AccessArticle

Cognitive Performance Following Ingestion of Glucose–Fructose Sweeteners That Impart Different Postprandial Glycaemic Responses: A Randomised Control Trial

1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
2
Department of Psychological Medicine, Otago Medical School, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2647; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112647
Received: 20 September 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 31 October 2019 / Published: 4 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fructose and Glucose Intake and Human Health)
We aimed to investigate the isolated effect of glycaemia on cognitive test performance by using beverages sweetened with two different glucose–fructose disaccharides, sucrose and isomaltulose. In a randomised crossover design, 70 healthy adults received a low-glycaemic-index (GI) isomaltulose and sucralose beverage (GI 32) and a high-GI sucrose beverage (GI 65) on two occasions that were separated by two weeks. Following beverage ingestion, declarative memory and immediate word recall were examined at 30, 80 and 130 min. At 140 min, executive function was tested. To confirm that the glycaemic response of the test beverages matched published GI estimates, a subsample (n = 12) of the cognitive testing population (n = 70) underwent glycaemic response testing on different test days. A significantly lower value of mean (95% CI) blood glucose concentration incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was found for isomaltulose, in comparison to the blood glucose concentration iAUC value for sucrose, the difference corresponding to −44 mmol/L∙min (−70, −18), p = 0.003. The mean (95% CI) difference in numbers of correct answers or words recalled between beverages at 30, 80 and 130 min were 0.1 (−0.2, 0.5), −0.3 (−0.8, 0.2) and 0.0 (−0.5, 0.5) for declarative memory, and −0.5 (−1.4, 0.3), 0.4 (−0.4, 1.3) and −0.4 (−1.1, 0.4) for immediate free word recall. At 140 min, the mean difference in the trail-making test between beverages was −0.3 sec (−6.9, 6.3). None of these differences were statistically or clinically significant. In summary, cognitive performance was unaffected by different glycaemic responses to beverages during the postprandial period of 140 min. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; fructose; sucrose; isomaltulose; glycaemia; insulinaemia; cognition glucose; fructose; sucrose; isomaltulose; glycaemia; insulinaemia; cognition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Keesing, C.; Mills, B.; Rapsey, C.; Haszard, J.; Venn, B. Cognitive Performance Following Ingestion of Glucose–Fructose Sweeteners That Impart Different Postprandial Glycaemic Responses: A Randomised Control Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2647. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112647

AMA Style

Keesing C, Mills B, Rapsey C, Haszard J, Venn B. Cognitive Performance Following Ingestion of Glucose–Fructose Sweeteners That Impart Different Postprandial Glycaemic Responses: A Randomised Control Trial. Nutrients. 2019; 11(11):2647. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112647

Chicago/Turabian Style

Keesing, Celeste; Mills, Brianna; Rapsey, Charlene; Haszard, Jillian; Venn, Bernard. 2019. "Cognitive Performance Following Ingestion of Glucose–Fructose Sweeteners That Impart Different Postprandial Glycaemic Responses: A Randomised Control Trial" Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2647. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112647

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