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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Food Components and Dietary Habits: Keys for a Healthy Gut Microbiota Composition

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UOC di Nutrizione Clinica, Dipartimento di Scienze Gastroenterologiche, Endocrino‑Metaboliche e Nefro‑Urologiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Largo A. Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
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Istituto di Patologia Speciale Medica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo F. Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy
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Scuola di Specializzazione in Scienza dell’Alimentazione, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
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UOC di Medicina Interna e Gastroenterologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Gastroenterologiche, Endocrino‑Metaboliche e Nefro‑Urologiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Largo A. Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2393; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102393
Received: 21 June 2019 / Revised: 25 September 2019 / Accepted: 27 September 2019 / Published: 7 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
The gut microbiota is a changing ecosystem, containing trillions of bacteria, continuously shaped by many factors, such as dietary habits, seasonality, lifestyle, stress, antibiotics use, or diseases. A healthy host–microorganisms balance must be respected in order to optimally maintain the intestinal barrier and immune system functions and, consequently, prevent disease development. In the past several decades, the adoption of modern dietary habits has become a growing health concern, as it is strongly associated with obesity and related metabolic diseases, promoting inflammation and both structural and behavioral changes in gut microbiota. In this context, novel dietary strategies are emerging to prevent diseases and maintain health. However, the consequences of these different diets on gut microbiota modulation are still largely unknown, and could potentially lead to alterations of gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and the immune system. The present review aimed to focus on the impact of single food components (macronutrients and micronutrients), salt, food additives, and different dietary habits (i.e., vegan and vegetarian, gluten-free, ketogenic, high sugar, low FODMAP, Western-type, and Mediterranean diets) on gut microbiota composition in order to define the optimal diet for a healthy modulation of gut microbiota.
Keywords: non-communicable diseases; leaky gut; gut microbiota modulation; diet; macronutrients; micronutrients; salt; food additives; low-calorie sweeteners; dietary emulsifiers; dietary habits; personalized medicine non-communicable diseases; leaky gut; gut microbiota modulation; diet; macronutrients; micronutrients; salt; food additives; low-calorie sweeteners; dietary emulsifiers; dietary habits; personalized medicine
MDPI and ACS Style

Rinninella, E.; Cintoni, M.; Raoul, P.; Lopetuso, L.R.; Scaldaferri, F.; Pulcini, G.; Miggiano, G.A.D.; Gasbarrini, A.; Mele, M.C. Food Components and Dietary Habits: Keys for a Healthy Gut Microbiota Composition. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2393.

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