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Open AccessArticle

Probiotic Supplementation is Associated with Increased Antioxidant Capacity and Copper Chelation in C. difficile-Infected Fecal Water

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School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Montréal, QC H9X3V9, Canada
2
Rosell® Institute for Microbiome and Probiotics, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montréal, QC H4P 2R2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2007; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092007
Received: 29 June 2019 / Revised: 19 August 2019 / Accepted: 23 August 2019 / Published: 26 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
Probiotic supplementation plays a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis due to its ability to modulate gut microbiota. Although their potential as potent antioxidants have previously been explored, their ability to affect the redox status in the gut lumen of healthy subjects or those with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders remains unclear. In our study, we assessed the ability of single strain and multispecies probiotic supplementation to cause a change in the redox status of normal fecal water and in Clostridium (C.) difficile-infected fecal water using a simulated gastrointestinal model. Changes in redox status were assessed by ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2’,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and iron and copper chelation assays. The findings from our study showed that in normal fecal water, probiotic supplements, apart from Lactobacillus (L.) rhamnosus R0011, showed a significant increase in iron chelation (p < 0.05), which was associated with lower FRAP and copper chelation. In C. difficile-infected fecal water, all probiotic supplements showed a significant increase in FRAP (p < 0.05) and were associated with increased copper chelation. The DPPH assay showed no treatment effect in either fecal water. These findings suggest that C. difficile mediates dysregulation of redox status, which is counteracted by probiotics through ferric-reducing ability and copper chelation. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; Clostridium difficile; antioxidant; fecal water; iron chelation; copper chelation; FRAP; DPPH; gastrointestinal model probiotics; Clostridium difficile; antioxidant; fecal water; iron chelation; copper chelation; FRAP; DPPH; gastrointestinal model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gaisawat, M.B.; Iskandar, M.M.; MacPherson, C.W.; Tompkins, T.A.; Kubow, S. Probiotic Supplementation is Associated with Increased Antioxidant Capacity and Copper Chelation in C. difficile-Infected Fecal Water. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2007.

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