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Future Internet, Volume 6, Issue 1 (March 2014) – 8 articles , Pages 1-189

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Article
Mobility Tolerant Firework Routing for Improving Reachability in MANETs
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 171-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010171 - 24 Mar 2014
Viewed by 2732
Abstract
In this paper, we investigate our mobility-assisted and adaptive broadcast routing mechanism, called Mobility Tolerant Firework Routing (MTFR), which utilizes the concept of potentials for routing and improves node reachability, especially in situations with high mobility, by including a broadcast mechanism. We perform [...] Read more.
In this paper, we investigate our mobility-assisted and adaptive broadcast routing mechanism, called Mobility Tolerant Firework Routing (MTFR), which utilizes the concept of potentials for routing and improves node reachability, especially in situations with high mobility, by including a broadcast mechanism. We perform detailed evaluations by simulations in a mobile environment and demonstrate the advantages of MTFR over conventional potential-based routing. In particular, we show that MTFR produces better reachability in many aspects at the expense of a small additional transmission delay and intermediate traffic overhead, making MTFR a promising routing protocol and feasible for future mobile Internet infrastructures. Full article
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Article
A Novel DOA Estimation Algorithm Using Array Rotation Technique
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 155-170; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010155 - 17 Mar 2014
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3815
Abstract
The performance of traditional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm based on uniform circular array (UCA) is constrained by the array aperture. Furthermore, the array requires more antenna elements than targets, which will increase the size and weight of the device and cause [...] Read more.
The performance of traditional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm based on uniform circular array (UCA) is constrained by the array aperture. Furthermore, the array requires more antenna elements than targets, which will increase the size and weight of the device and cause higher energy loss. In order to solve these issues, a novel low energy algorithm utilizing array base-line rotation for multiple targets estimation is proposed. By rotating two elements and setting a fixed time delay, even the number of elements is selected to form a virtual UCA. Then, the received data of signals will be sampled at multiple positions, which improves the array elements utilization greatly. 2D-DOA estimation of the rotation array is accomplished via multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithms. Finally, the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) is derived and simulation results verified the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm with high resolution and estimation accuracy performance. Besides, because of the significant reduction of array elements number, the array antennas system is much simpler and less complex than traditional array. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Communications and Networking)
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Article
Information Integration Platform for Patient-Centric Healthcare Services: Design, Prototype and Dependability Aspects
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 126-154; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010126 - 06 Mar 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4234
Abstract
Technology innovations have pushed today’s healthcare sector to an unprecedented new level. Various portable and wearable medical and fitness devices are being sold in the consumer market to provide the self-empowerment of a healthier lifestyle to society. Many vendors provide additional cloud-based services [...] Read more.
Technology innovations have pushed today’s healthcare sector to an unprecedented new level. Various portable and wearable medical and fitness devices are being sold in the consumer market to provide the self-empowerment of a healthier lifestyle to society. Many vendors provide additional cloud-based services for devices they manufacture, enabling the users to visualize, store and share the gathered information through the Internet. However, most of these services are integrated with the devices in a closed “silo” manner, where the devices can only be used with the provided services. To tackle this issue, an information integration platform (IIP) has been developed to support communications between devices and Internet-based services in an event-driven fashion by adopting service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles and a publish/subscribe messaging pattern. It follows the “Internet of Things” (IoT) idea of connecting everyday objects to various networks and to enable the dissemination of the gathered information to the global information space through the Internet. A patient-centric healthcare service environment is chosen as the target scenario for the deployment of the platform, as this is a domain where IoT can have a direct positive impact on quality of life enhancement. This paper describes the developed platform, with emphasis on dependability aspects, including availability, scalability and security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward people aware IoT)
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Article
Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Knowledge Acquisition in Spatial Planning
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 109-125; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010109 - 05 Mar 2014
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4859
Abstract
The term “crowdsourcing” was initially introduced by Howe in his article “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” [1]. During the last few years, crowdsourcing has become popular among companies, institutions and universities, as a crowd-centered modern “tool” for problem solving. Crowdsourcing is mainly based on [...] Read more.
The term “crowdsourcing” was initially introduced by Howe in his article “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” [1]. During the last few years, crowdsourcing has become popular among companies, institutions and universities, as a crowd-centered modern “tool” for problem solving. Crowdsourcing is mainly based on the idea of an open-call publication of a problem, requesting the response of the crowd for reaching the most appropriate solution. The focus of this paper is on the role of crowdsourcing in knowledge acquisition for planning applications. The first part provides an introduction to the origins of crowdsourcing in knowledge generation. The second part elaborates on the concept of crowdsourcing, while some indicative platforms supporting the development of crowdsourcing applications are also described. The third part focuses on the integration of crowdsourcing with certain web technologies and GIS (Geographic Information Systems), for spatial planning applications, while in the fourth part, a general framework of the rationale behind crowdsourcing applications is presented. Finally, the fifth part focuses on a range of case studies that adopted several crowdsourcing techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Editorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Future Internet in 2013
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 107-108; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010107 - 24 Feb 2014
Viewed by 2057
Abstract
The editors of Future Internet would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2013. [...] Full article
Review
Recent Developments and Future Trends in Volunteered Geographic Information Research: The Case of OpenStreetMap
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 76-106; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010076 - 27 Jan 2014
Cited by 116 | Viewed by 13991
Abstract
User-generated content (UGC) platforms on the Internet have experienced a steep increase in data contributions in recent years. The ubiquitous usage of location-enabled devices, such as smartphones, allows contributors to share their geographic information on a number of selected online portals. The collected [...] Read more.
User-generated content (UGC) platforms on the Internet have experienced a steep increase in data contributions in recent years. The ubiquitous usage of location-enabled devices, such as smartphones, allows contributors to share their geographic information on a number of selected online portals. The collected information is oftentimes referred to as volunteered geographic information (VGI). One of the most utilized, analyzed and cited VGI-platforms, with an increasing popularity over the past few years, is OpenStreetMap (OSM), whose main goal it is to create a freely available geographic database of the world. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in VGI research, focusing on its collaboratively collected geodata and corresponding contributor patterns. Additionally, trends in the realm of OSM research are discussed, highlighting which aspects need to be investigated more closely in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Article
Analysis Matrix for Smart Cities
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 61-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010061 - 22 Jan 2014
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 6809
Abstract
The current digital revolution has ignited the evolution of communications grids and the development of new schemes for productive systems. Traditional technologic scenarios have been challenged, and Smart Cities have become the basis for urban competitiveness. The citizen is the one who has [...] Read more.
The current digital revolution has ignited the evolution of communications grids and the development of new schemes for productive systems. Traditional technologic scenarios have been challenged, and Smart Cities have become the basis for urban competitiveness. The citizen is the one who has the power to set new scenarios, and that is why a definition of the way people interact with their cities is needed, as is commented in the first part of the article. At the same time, a lack of clarity has been detected in the way of describing what Smart Cities are, and the second part will try to set the basis for that. For all before, the information and communication technologies that manage and transform 21st century cities must be reviewed, analyzing their impact on new social behaviors that shape the spaces and means of communication, as is posed in the experimental section, setting the basis for an analysis matrix to score the different elements that affect a Smart City environment. So, as the better way to evaluate what a Smart City is, there is a need for a tool to score the different technologies on the basis of their usefulness and consequences, considering the impact of each application. For all of that, the final section describes the main objective of this article in practical scenarios, considering how the technologies are used by citizens, who must be the main concern of all urban development. Full article
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Article
A Comparison of Internet Protocol (IPv6) Security Guidelines
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 1-60; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi6010001 - 10 Jan 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4576
Abstract
The next generation of the Internet Protocol (IPv6) is currently about to be introduced in many organizations. However, its security features are still a very novel area of expertise for many practitioners. This study evaluates guidelines for secure deployment of IPv6, published by [...] Read more.
The next generation of the Internet Protocol (IPv6) is currently about to be introduced in many organizations. However, its security features are still a very novel area of expertise for many practitioners. This study evaluates guidelines for secure deployment of IPv6, published by the U.S. NIST and the German federal agency BSI, for topicality, completeness and depth. The later two are scores defined in this paper and are based on the Requests for Comments relevant for IPv6 that were categorized, weighted and ranked for importance using an expert survey. Both guides turn out to be of practical value, but have a specific focus and are directed towards different audiences. Moreover, recommendations for possible improvements are presented. Our results could also support strategic management decisions on security priorities as well as for the choice of security guidelines for IPv6 roll-outs. Full article
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