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Open AccessArticle

LGBT+ Health Teaching within the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum

1
Department, University College London Medical School, London WC1E 6JL, UK
2
Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London NW3 2QG, UK
3
Groundwork London, London SE1 7QZ, UK
4
UCL Institute of Health Informatics, London NW1 2DA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2305; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132305
Received: 13 June 2019 / Revised: 26 June 2019 / Accepted: 27 June 2019 / Published: 28 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Wellbeing in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity)
Introduction: The lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT+) population experience health and social inequalities, including discrimination within healthcare services. There is a growing international awareness of the importance of providing healthcare professionals and students with dedicated training on LGBT+ health. Methods: We introduced a compulsory teaching programme in a large London-based medical school, including a visit from a transgender patient. Feedback was collected across four years, before (n = 433) and after (n = 541) the session. Student confidence in using appropriate terminology and performing a clinical assessment on LGBT+ people was assessed with five-point Likert scales. Fisher exact tests were used to compare the proportion responding “agree” or “strongly agree”. Results: Of the students, 95% (CI 93–97%) found the teaching useful with 97% (96–99%) finding the visitor’s input helpful. Confidence using appropriate terminology to describe sexual orientation increased from 62% (58–67%) to 93% (91–95%) (Fisher p < 0.001) and gender identity from 41% (36–46%) to 91% (88–93%) (p < 0.001). Confidence in the clinical assessment of a lesbian, gay or bisexual patient increased from 75% (71–79%) to 93% (90–95%) (p < 0.001), and of a transgender patient from 35% (31–40%) to 84% (80–87%) (p < 0.001). Discussion: This teaching programme, written and delivered in collaboration with the LGBT+ community, increases students’ confidence in using appropriate language related to sexual orientation and gender identity, and in the clinical assessment of LGBT+ patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: LGBT; gay; lesbian; transgender; undergraduate medical education; decolonizing the curriculum; medical education; curriculum development LGBT; gay; lesbian; transgender; undergraduate medical education; decolonizing the curriculum; medical education; curriculum development
MDPI and ACS Style

Salkind, J.; Gishen, F.; Drage, G.; Kavanagh, J.; Potts, H.W.W. LGBT+ Health Teaching within the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2305.

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