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S1P/S1P Receptor Signaling in Neuromuscolar Disorders

1
Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences “Mario Serio”, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence, Italy
2
Interuniversity Institute of Myology, University of Firenze, 50134 Firenze, Italy
3
Department of Biology, Unit of Physiology, University of Pisa, via S. Zeno 31, 56127 Pisa, Italy
4
Interdepartmental Research Center “Nutraceuticals and Food for Health”, University of Pisa, 56127 Pisa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246364
Received: 20 November 2019 / Revised: 6 December 2019 / Accepted: 13 December 2019 / Published: 17 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sphingolipids: Metabolic Functions and Disorders)
The bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and the signaling pathways triggered by its binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors play a critical regulatory role in many pathophysiological processes, including skeletal muscle and nervous system degeneration. The signaling transduced by S1P binding appears to be much more complex than previously thought, with important implications for clinical applications and for personalized medicine. In particular, the understanding of S1P/S1P receptor signaling functions in specific compartmentalized locations of the cell is worthy of being better investigated, because in various circumstances it might be crucial for the development or/and the progression of neuromuscular diseases, such as Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, myasthenia gravis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. View Full-Text
Keywords: sphingolipids; sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors; ceramide; skeletal muscle; nervous system; neuromuscular disease; Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; myasthenia gravis; duchenne muscular dystrophy sphingolipids; sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors; ceramide; skeletal muscle; nervous system; neuromuscular disease; Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; myasthenia gravis; duchenne muscular dystrophy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meacci, E.; Garcia-Gil, M. S1P/S1P Receptor Signaling in Neuromuscolar Disorders. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 6364.

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