Topic Editors

Medical School, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus
Kent and Medway Medical School, University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury CT2 7FS, UK
Dr. Eirini Kampriani
Medical School, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus
Dr. Jeni Harden
Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8, UK

Teaching Social Sciences and Humanities in Medicine, Allied Health and Social Care

Abstract submission deadline
10 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
25 December 2024
Viewed by
7024

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Teaching social sciences and humanities to students on medical and health courses, such as medicine, allied health (including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, pharmacy), and social care, has been acknowledged as challenging and demanding. Educators on such courses commonly make a special effort to gain and maintain students’ interest and show the relevance of social sciences and humanities for their future healthcare practice. This Topic welcomes contributions on teaching and learning social sciences in its broadest sense (including sociology, psychology, anthropology, medical and health humanities, etc.), around curriculum development for healthcare and allied healthcare education, and/or how social sciences and medical humanities have contributed to students’ development as professionals and helped the communities they serve and the patients receiving healthcare. Research articles, reviews, and perspective and concept papers are welcomed. In the event that your work is not reflected in the above description and you are interested in submitting to this Topic, please contact Professor Costas S. Constantinou [email protected].

Prof. Dr. Costas S Constantinou
Prof. Dr. Lisa Dikomitis
Dr. Eirini Kampriani
Dr. Jeni Harden
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • social sciences teaching
  • medical education
  • health humanities
  • curriculum development
  • healthcare students
  • medical education
  • health education
  • medical anthropology

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Education Sciences
education
3.0 4.0 2011 24.9 Days CHF 1800 Submit
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Humanities
humanities
0.3 0.7 2012 30.4 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Societies
societies
2.1 2.3 2011 32.6 Days CHF 1400 Submit
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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9 pages, 570 KiB  
Article
Perception of Medical Humanities among Polish Medical Students: Qualitative Analysis
by Marta Makowska, Agnieszka J. Szczepek, Inetta Nowosad, Anna Weissbrot-Koziarska and Joanna Dec-Pietrowska
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010270 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1469
Abstract
Medical humanities (MH) courses are a critical element of the medical curriculum influencing the establishment of a physician in the medical profession. However, the opinion about MH among medical students remains unknown. Interviews from seven focus groups were analysed. The students attended one [...] Read more.
Medical humanities (MH) courses are a critical element of the medical curriculum influencing the establishment of a physician in the medical profession. However, the opinion about MH among medical students remains unknown. Interviews from seven focus groups were analysed. The students attended one of three Polish medical schools in Gdansk, Krakow, and Warsaw and were recruited to the discussion focused on the impact of drug manufacturers’ presence at medical universities on socialization in the medical profession. Thematic analysis was conducted using the theoretical framework of social constructivism. The students’ opinions about the MH classes arose during the analysis. In six groups, students thought that MH courses would be helpful in their future medical practice. However, in four groups, different opinion was expressed that MH courses were unnecessary or even “a waste of time”. Factors discouraging students from the MH classes included poorly taught courses (monotonous, uninteresting, unrelated to medical practice, taught by unsuitable lecturers). Secondly, students thought that the time investment in the MH was too extensive. Furthermore, curriculum problems were identified, reflecting the incompatibility between the content of MH courses and teaching semesters. Lastly, some students stated that participation in MH courses should be elective and based on individual interests. Addressing problems recognized in this work could improve the training of future Polish physicians. Full article
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15 pages, 1179 KiB  
Article
A Multisite Assessment of Saudi Bachelor Nursing Students’ Perceptions of Clinical Competence and Learning Environments: A Multivariate Conceptual Model Testing
by Mohammad Hamdi Abuadas
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2554; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122554 - 16 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1641
Abstract
Background: It is thought that students’ perceptions of educational and clinical learning environments improve the effectiveness of curricula and professional standards. It is essential to examine the educational and clinical learning environments in which nursing students learn, as well as how nursing students [...] Read more.
Background: It is thought that students’ perceptions of educational and clinical learning environments improve the effectiveness of curricula and professional standards. It is essential to examine the educational and clinical learning environments in which nursing students learn, as well as how nursing students evaluate particular factors of these environments. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to (1) identify nursing students’ perceptions on professional competence and learning environments in the classroom and clinical settings and (2) test a hypothetical model of variables that influence and predict students’ perceptions of learning environments and professional competencies. Methods: The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional methodological design. Five hundred and eighteen undergraduate nursing students were recruited from three Saudi Arabian universities using a convenient sampling technique. Using valid and reliable self-reported questionnaires, including the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the modified Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI), and the Nurse Professional Competence Scale-Short (NPCS-SF), data were collected. Results: Perceptions of professional competence and learning environments were positive among nursing students. With satisfactory fit indices, the final model found that students’ perceptions of clinical competence were significantly predicted by their perceptions of the clinical environment (B = 0.43, p < 0.001), students’ perceptions of university environments (B = 0.29, p < 0.001), ward type (B = 0.12, p < 0.001), and students’ year of study (B = 0.11, p < 0.001). The students’ perceptions of clinical environments were significantly predicted by their perceptions of the university environment (B = 0.31, p < 0.001), gender (B = 0.13, p < 0.001), students’ year of study (B = 0.12, p < 0.001), and ward type (B = 0.11, p < 0.001). Moreover, the students’ perceptions of the university environment were significantly predicted by gender (B = 0.11, p < 0.001) and length of training (B = 0.12, p < 0.001). Conclusions: A range of factors might influence students’ perceptions of their professional competence and learning environments. Improving the learning environments and clinical experiences of students could enhance their clinical competence. This study’s findings provide evidence for how to enhance the learning environments in the classroom and clinical settings in order to improve students’ clinical competence, which will ultimately result in better patient outcomes. It is a top priority for nursing educators all around the world to improve classroom and clinical learning settings that foster students’ learning and professional competencies. Full article
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16 pages, 1079 KiB  
Article
Designing Categories for a Mixed-Method Research on Competence Development and Professional Identity through Collegial Advice in Nursing Education in Germany
by Stefan Wellensiek, Jan P. Ehlers and Michaela Zupanic
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2517; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122517 - 12 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1438
Abstract
Background: The aim of nursing education in Germany is the development of different competences, including professional identity. To promote this, the use of collegial consultation in the form of collegial advice is recommended. How collegial advice affects the development of competences and professional [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of nursing education in Germany is the development of different competences, including professional identity. To promote this, the use of collegial consultation in the form of collegial advice is recommended. How collegial advice affects the development of competences and professional identity, and which didactic and organizational framework conditions are favorable for this have not yet been conclusively clarified. Objectives: The aim of the study is to determine how collegial consultation affects the development of competence and professional identity of student nurses. Enabling and hindering factors for the success of collegial advice will be identified. Design/ Participants: A mixed-methods study with 25 student nurses who completed training in collegial advice and then regularly engaged in collegial advice for one year. Methods: A content analysis from four focus group interviews using a category system developed for this purpose. Results: This article reports the development of the category system necessary for the content analysis with examples. The resulting categories are presented. Conclusions: The category system has high objectivity, reliability, and validity. It contains links to competence and identity research in the care sector. A suitable instrument has been developed for further evaluation of the focus group interviews. Full article
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