Topic Editors

Future Ecosystems Lab, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Tsinghua Shenzhen International Graduate School, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, China
Dr. Jie Li
Institute of Informatics, University of Amsterdam, 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Ecosystem Monitoring: Collective Eco-Environmental Information for Nature-Based Solutions

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 April 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
30 June 2024
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3617

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecological monitoring is an increasingly important factor for sensing ecosystem shifts and for ecosystem management aiming to preserve ecosystem function and associated services under climate and anthropogenic pressures. This Topic focuses on ecosystem monitoring considering ecological indicators of species and communities (particularly related to collective dynamics and its organization, e.g., via entropy characterization, environmental indicators such as water–soil–air features and their disturbance, as well as the nexus between ecological, environmental and social dynamics to understand their linkage, anticipate and control ecosystem shifts via nature-based solutions. Emphasis is also placed on social-policy decisions, technology related to novel sensors, ecological monitoring networks, multiscale data (phenotypical, phylogenetic, eDNA, macroecological, etc.), data fusion, pattern analysis, and inference models for the extraction of salient predictive information and ecosystem engineering (ecological and environmental engineering techniques for natural and man-made ecosystems). Preference is given to ecosystems where the nexus between water and ecology is emphasized (rivers, lakes, oceans, etc.) and the linkage among habitats (e.g., for blue-carbon habitats at the land–ocean interface) and how these connections can be engineered to determine desired climatic and socio-ecological feedback such as increases in carbon sequestration, population health, natural resources, and economic returns due to hazard reduction.

Dr. Matteo Convertino
Dr. Jie Li
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • biodiversity
  • ecosystems
  • environment
  • ecology
  • monitoring
  • sensing
  • models
  • predictions
  • information
  • networks
  • collective
  • dynamics

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Entropy
entropy
2.7 4.7 1999 20.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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13 pages, 2800 KiB  
Article
Collaborative Monitoring of Plant Biodiversity and Research on Sweet Acorn Oaks within Paths of Knowledge and Sustainability Education
by Antonino Soddu Pirellas, Mauro Ballero, Sebastiano Porcu, Giovanna Serra, Francesco Sanna and Michele Puxeddu
Environments 2024, 11(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11030059 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1252
Abstract
Numerous studies have shown the multiple benefits of plant biodiversity and the crucial role of residents’ awareness of conservation and land management. Plant biodiversity was investigated in an analytical monitoring report conducted jointly with the local population engaged in livestock activities and young [...] Read more.
Numerous studies have shown the multiple benefits of plant biodiversity and the crucial role of residents’ awareness of conservation and land management. Plant biodiversity was investigated in an analytical monitoring report conducted jointly with the local population engaged in livestock activities and young residents who were shifting toward hospitality and tourism. The study area, covering over 800 km2 in Sardinia, is half forested and attracts interest in its landscape. During our research, genotypes of Quercus ilex L., with sweet acorns rich in polyphenols, as the oldest ecosystem services in these rural communities, were discovered. Collaborative monitoring focused attention on the benefits of plants in different habitats as follows: 53% were known to livestock farmers as food for local breeds of goats and pigs, 15% were official, and 13% were endemic. They had also been used for human nutrition within the Mediterranean diet and attracted interest for their use in landscapes and gardens. This study analyzes numerical data from critical and educational perspectives. These data serve as indicators of ecosystem health for the purpose of sustainable management policies and attest to collaborative monitoring as a tool for analyzing human activities and the necessary balance between profit and biodiversity conservation, given the current challenging climate change conditions. Full article
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20 pages, 12897 KiB  
Article
Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics and Influencing Factors in the Zoige Alpine Wetland from the 1980s to 2020 Based on a Random Forest Model
by Haotian Zhang, Jianheng Wang, Yichen Zhang, Hongyu Qian, Zhiyi Xie, Yufu Hu, Yongjie Huang, Chuan Zhao, Wanli Cheng, Xiaoxuan Feng, Haoran Qi and Siqi Du
Land 2023, 12(10), 1923; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12101923 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1371
Abstract
Wetlands provide important ecosystem services, such as water conservation, biodiversity protection, and carbon sequestration. The Zoige alpine wetland is the largest high-altitude swamp in the world and plays a critical role in regional ecological balance and climate change. However, little is known about [...] Read more.
Wetlands provide important ecosystem services, such as water conservation, biodiversity protection, and carbon sequestration. The Zoige alpine wetland is the largest high-altitude swamp in the world and plays a critical role in regional ecological balance and climate change. However, little is known about the fate of its soil organic carbon (SOC) storage. In this study, we estimated the degradation status of the wetland over the past 35 years and used machine learning to investigate the dynamics and driving factors of SOC at different soil depths of the Zoige wetland in 1985, 2000, and 2020. We also simulated the future SOC balance under different scenarios. The results showed that the area of Zoige wetland has degraded by 378.71 km2 in the past 35 years. Increased precipitation and solar radiation offset the adverse effects of global warming, making the soil act as a carbon sink in the past 35 years. The total SOC storage of the wetland soils in 1985, 2000, and 2020 was estimated to be 2.03 Pg, 2.05 Pg, and 2.21 Pg, respectively, with 46.95% of SOC distributed in the subsoil layers. Climate change was the most important driving factor controlling the SOC storage of the Zoige wetland, explaining 51.33% of the SOC changes in the soil. Temperature change was always the most important factor controlling wetland SOC, and precipitation had a greater impact on the topsoil. Under the temperature control targets of 1.5 °C and 2 °C, the SOC pool of the Zoige wetland will decrease by 60.21 Tg C and 69.19 Tg C, respectively. Under scenarios of a 10% and 20% increase in precipitation, the wetland soil will accumulate an additional 46.53 Tg C and 118.89 Tg C, respectively. The study results provide important references for the sustainable management of the Zoige wetland under the background of global climate change. Full article
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