Topic Editors

Key Laboratory of Deep Underground Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, College of Water Resource & Hydropower, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
Dr. Ang Liu
Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Geotechnics, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
State Key Laboratory of Marine Resources Utilization in South China Sea, Hainan University, Haikou, China

Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment

Abstract submission deadline
closed (29 February 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
31 May 2024
Viewed by
9359

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geological resources are one of the most abundant resources on Earth, including oil and gas, geothermal energy, shale gas, coal bed gas, etc. The exploration and development of these resources involve multidisciplinary knowledge. The purpose of this topic is to publish research results of the highest quality and lasting importance in geomechanics topics, focusing on the application of geological energy production and storage and the interaction between soil and rock and natural and engineering environments. We will pay special attention to the concept and development of new energy geotechnical technology, which includes the internal mechanism of protecting the environment from damage caused by potential projects, so as to ensure the sustainable use of energy. The main topics of the Topic include but are not limited to the following:

  • Multiphase flow and transport in porous media;
  • Carbon dioxide sequestration/hydrogen storage in geological formations;
  • Mathematical modeling and numerical simulations on coupled processes;
  • Development, storage, and transportation of unconventional oil and gas;
  • Mine geological disaster prevention and reduction;
  • Mathematical problems in rock mechanics and rock engineering;
  • Geological energy production and storage;
  • Environmental protection in resource development;
  • Application of machine learning to address complex problems related to energy and environment.

Dr. Gan Feng
Dr. Ang Liu
Dr. Reza Taherdangkoo
Prof. Dr. Qiao Lyu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • rock mechanics
  • geological energy
  • CCUS
  • environmental protection
  • machine learning

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Fractal and Fractional
fractalfract
5.4 3.6 2017 18.9 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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6 pages, 218 KiB  
Editorial
Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment
by Gan Feng, Hongqiang Xie, Ang Liu, Reza Taherdangkoo and Qiao Lyu
Energies 2023, 16(18), 6588; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16186588 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 992
Abstract
Geological energy is an abundant source of energy on Earth, encompassing both fossil and non-fossil forms such as oil, natural gas, coal, geothermal energy, shale gas, and coalbed methane [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment)
18 pages, 12394 KiB  
Article
Quantifying the Rock Damage Intensity Controlled by Mineral Compositions: Insights from Fractal Analyses
by Özge Dinç Göğüş, Elif Avşar, Kayhan Develi and Ayten Çalık
Fractal Fract. 2023, 7(5), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/fractalfract7050383 - 3 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1440
Abstract
Since each rock type represents different deformation characteristics, prediction of the damage beforehand is one of the most fundamental problems of industrial activities and rock engineering studies. Previous studies have predicted the stress–strain behaviors preceding rock failure; however, quantitative analyses of the progressive [...] Read more.
Since each rock type represents different deformation characteristics, prediction of the damage beforehand is one of the most fundamental problems of industrial activities and rock engineering studies. Previous studies have predicted the stress–strain behaviors preceding rock failure; however, quantitative analyses of the progressive damage in different rocks under stress have not been accurately presented. This study aims to quantify pre-failure rock damage by investigating the stress-induced microscale cracking process in three different rock types, including diabase, ignimbrite, and marble, representing strong, medium-hard, and weak rock types, respectively. We demonstrate crack intensity at critical stress levels where cracking initiates (σci), propagates (σcd), and where failure occurs (σpeak) based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Furthermore, the progression of rock damage was quantified for each rock type through the fractal analyses of crack patterns on these images. Our results show that the patterns in diabase have the highest fractal dimensions (DB) for all three stress levels. While marble produces the lowest DB value up to σci stress level, it presents greater DB values than those of ignimbrite, starting from the σcd level. This is because rock damage in ignimbrite is controlled by the groundmass, proceeding from such stress level. Rock texture controls the rock stiffness and, hence, the DB values of cracking. The mineral composition is effective on the rock strength, but the textural pattern of the minerals has a first-order control on the rock deformation behavior. Overall, our results provide a better understanding of progressive damage in different rock types, which is crucial in the design of engineering structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment)
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20 pages, 5576 KiB  
Article
Research on the Response Mechanism of Coal Rock Mass under Stress and Pressure
by Pengfei Shan, Wei Li, Xingping Lai, Shuai Zhang, Xingzhou Chen and Xiaochen Wu
Materials 2023, 16(8), 3235; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16083235 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 902
Abstract
In this paper, the strength and deformation failure characteristics of bearing coal rock mass are related to the confining pressure, and the SAS-2000 experimental system is used to carry out uniaxial and 3, 6, and 9 MPa triaxial tests on coal rock to [...] Read more.
In this paper, the strength and deformation failure characteristics of bearing coal rock mass are related to the confining pressure, and the SAS-2000 experimental system is used to carry out uniaxial and 3, 6, and 9 MPa triaxial tests on coal rock to assess the strength and deformation failure characteristics of coal rock under different confining pressure conditions. The results show that the stress–strain curve of coal rock undergoes four evolutionary stages after fracture: compaction, elasticity, plasticity, and rupture. With confining pressure, the peak strength of coal rock increases, and the elastic modulus increases nonlinearly. The coal sample changes more with confining pressure, and the elastic modulus is generally smaller than that of fine sandstone. The stage of evolution under confining pressure constitutes the failure process of coal rock, with the stress of different evolution stages causing various degrees of damage to coal rock. In the initial compaction stage, the unique pore structure of the coal sample makes the confining pressure effect more apparent; the confining pressure makes the bearing capacity of the coal rock plastic stage stronger, the residual strength of the coal sample has a linear relationship with the confining pressure, and the residual strength of the fine sandstone has a nonlinear relationship with the confining pressure. Changing the confining pressure state will cause the two kinds of coal rock samples to change from brittle failure to plastic failure. Different coal rocks under uniaxial compression experience more brittle failure, and the overall degree of crushing is higher. The coal sample in the triaxial state experiences predominantly ductile fracture. The whole is relatively complete after failure as a shear failure occurs. The fine sandstone specimen experiences brittle failure. The degree of failure is low, and the confining pressure’s effect on the coal sample is obvious. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment)
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29 pages, 8242 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Binary Blending for Low-Volume Roads—Reliability-Based Design Approach and Carbon Footprint Analysis
by Gudla Amulya, Arif Ali Baig Moghal and Abdullah Almajed
Materials 2023, 16(5), 2065; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16052065 - 2 Mar 2023
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2710
Abstract
The utilization of industrial by-products as stabilizers is gaining attention from the sustainability perspective. Along these lines, granite sand (GS) and calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) are used as alternatives to traditional stabilizers for cohesive soil (clay). The unsoaked California Bearing Ratio (CBR) was taken [...] Read more.
The utilization of industrial by-products as stabilizers is gaining attention from the sustainability perspective. Along these lines, granite sand (GS) and calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) are used as alternatives to traditional stabilizers for cohesive soil (clay). The unsoaked California Bearing Ratio (CBR) was taken as a performance indicator (as a subgrade material for low-volume roads). A series of tests were performed by varying the dosages of GS (30%, 40%, and 50%) and CLS (0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, and 2%) for different curing periods (0, 7, and 28 days). This study revealed that the optimal dosages of granite sand (GS) are 35%, 34%, 33%, and 32% for dosages of calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0%, respectively. These values are needed to maintain a reliability index greater than or equal to 3.0 when the coefficient of variation (COV) of the minimum specified value of the CBR is 20% for a 28-day curing period. The proposed RBDO (reliability-based design optimization) presents an optimal design methodology for designing low-volume roads when GS and CLS are blended for clay soils. The optimal mix, i.e., 70% clay blended with 30% GS and 0.5% CLS (exhibiting the highest CBR value) is considered an appropriate dosage for the pavement subgrade material. Carbon footprint analysis (CFA) was performed on a typical pavement section according to Indian Road Congress recommendations. It is observed that the use of GS and CLS as stabilizers of clay reduces the carbon energy by 97.52% and 98.53% over the traditional stabilizers lime and cement at 6% and 4% dosages, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment)
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14 pages, 10127 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Damage Characteristics and Acoustic Properties of Red Sandstone with Different Water Contents under Microwave Radiation
by Junjun Liu, Jing Xie, Bengao Yang, Fei Li, Huchao Deng, Zundong Yang and Mingzhong Gao
Materials 2023, 16(3), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16030979 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1447
Abstract
Rock breaking is one of the most basic issues in deep underground engineering. Water plays an important role in the rock response under microwave radiation. Consequently, microwave radiation experiments using red sandstone with different water contents were conducted. The damage characteristics and ultrasonic [...] Read more.
Rock breaking is one of the most basic issues in deep underground engineering. Water plays an important role in the rock response under microwave radiation. Consequently, microwave radiation experiments using red sandstone with different water contents were conducted. The damage characteristics and ultrasonic properties of red sandstone after microwave radiation were primarily investigated, and the representative conclusions were drawn as follows: With the increase in water content, the time of complete formation of the rupture surface of the rock sample gradually decreased, and the decreasing range gradually increased. When the fracture surface is completely formed, the samples with a higher water content have more powdery rock cuttings and less surface roughness. The damage degree of the samples does not increase significantly with the increase in the water content when the sample is radiated at the same time. As the microwave radiation time is increased, the damage degree of the sample will increase significantly. Through the ultrasonic velocity test, it can be suggested that the sample exhibits obvious zonal damage characteristics under the action of a microwave. Generally speaking, it is a very effective means of improving the degree of microwave attenuation of the rock by increasing the water content of the rock mass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment)
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