Special Issue "Tools for Water Resources Monitoring, Water Erosion and Geomorphological Research"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Álvaro Gómez-Gutiérrez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute for Sustainable Territorial Development, University of Extremadura, 10071 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: geomorphology; photogrammetry; UAV; LIDAR; digital terrain analysis; spatial modelling
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. J. Francisco Lavado Contador
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Research Institute for Sustainable Territorial Development, University of Extremadura, Spain
Interests: spatial modelling; landscape ecology; LUCC; land degradation; biogeography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geomorphology in general, and soil erosion by water in particular, have experienced a great development in tools, methods and techniques in the past decade. The result has been a democratization in the availability of accurate and high-resolution spatial data that can be used to monitor, model and quantify geomorphological processes and water resources. Developments in photogrammetry have allowed the production of point clouds, orthophotos and DEMs of surface and submerged topography with consumer-grade cameras. Light, low-cost and accurate GNSS devices have provided the support for georeferencing these datasets and also for direct RTK referencing of UAV platforms. Laser technology (aerial and terrestrial) has also contributed to the production of high-density point clouds of geomorphological features. Many of these sensors, platforms and techniques have been integrated in systems for continuous and/or real-time monitoring that produce valuable information about the role of individual events.

Finally, the availability of big data datasets together with remote sensing technologies and the generalization of data mining, machine learning and model ensembling techniques have provided the tools for a better understanding of geomorphological processes and resources availability.

All these developments have been adopted as tools for the study and monitoring of water resources and geomorphological processes-features (sheet erosion, gullies, landslides, etc.) or to perform restoration activities in degraded areas. As these tools provide the frame for a better assessment of water resources, understanding of the processes (magnitude–frequency relationships) and the underlying factors, the present Special Issue covers works on the application of these techniques, methodological developments for the study of water resources, water erosion and geomorphological processes in general. Outstanding study cases but also review papers on specific topics on the subject are welcome.

Dr. Álvaro Gómez-Gutierrez
Dr. J. Francisco Lavado Contador
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil erosion
  • Water resources
  • Photogrammetry
  • UAV
  • LIDAR
  • TLS
  • 4D monitoring
  • Data mining
  • Machine learning
  • Big data

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Application of Multi-Source Data Fusion Method in Updating Topography and Estimating Sedimentation of the Reservoir
Water 2020, 12(11), 3057; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113057 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 539
Abstract
The underwater terrain of a reservoir can experience significant changes due to the effects of erosion and siltation during decades of operation. Therefore, existing topographic data no longer reflect current reservoir terrains and need to be updated. In this paper, we propose a [...] Read more.
The underwater terrain of a reservoir can experience significant changes due to the effects of erosion and siltation during decades of operation. Therefore, existing topographic data no longer reflect current reservoir terrains and need to be updated. In this paper, we propose a fast and economical method for updating the topography of a reservoir. According to multi-source data fusion, we effectively integrated sonar sounding data, cartographic data, and manual measurement data to update and reconstruct the bottom topography of a reservoir in Northeast China. By comparing the updated topography with the measured elevation, the average error of the simulation results is only 0.56%, which shows that the updated topography can accurately reflect the actual topography of the reservoir. Furthermore, by using the surface volume tool in ArcGIS, we developed the original and updated the elevation and volume curves of the reservoir. Finally, the amount of silting and its distribution in the reservoir were obtained by calculating the difference between the original and updated elevation and volume curves. The results show that the total sedimentation volume in the researching reservoir is about 4.3 million m3, which is mainly concentrated in the areas with an elevation below 50 m and above 60 m. Full article
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