Special Issue "Terrestrial Microplastics in Soil and Water"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Peter Kiewit Institute, Omaha, NE 68182-0178, USA
Interests: contaminant fate and transport; agroecosystems; terrestrial microplastics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plastics are a frequently observed component of marine debris, and there is growing concern about microplastic ecotoxicity and the impacts of sorbed hazardous organic contaminants, heavy metals, and biofilm on microplastic surfaces. Rivers are considered a major source of plastic marine debris; however, the relative importance of microplastics from different terrestrial and freshwater sources (e.g., storm water runoff, wastewater effluents, and application of agricultural soil amendments to land) is poorly understood and limits our ability to develop best management practices to eliminate their occurrence in and transport to marine systems. Prior studies have highlighted diverse secondary sources of microplastics, including fibers from clothing, application of sewage sludge to land, tires, construction activities, artificial turf, and improper waste disposal, and background levels of plastics in freshwater. Studies quantifying the importance of these various sources of plastics to freshwater and terrestrial systems are lacking.

For this Special Issue on microplastics in soil and water, we seek manuscripts that focus on the occurrence, transport, and ecological and human health impacts of microplastics in freshwater and soil systems within both rural and urban land uses.

Prof. Dr. Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microplastics
  • source tracking
  • freshwater systems
  • soil
  • sediment.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Can Zooplankton Be Entangled by Microfibers in the Marine Environment?: Laboratory Studies
Water 2020, 12(12), 3302; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123302 - 24 Nov 2020
Viewed by 563
Abstract
We investigated the probability of copepod entanglement in microfibers in a laboratory experiment. This experiment was inspired by an accidental observation of entangled copepods with microfibers during isolating copepods for grazing experiments. The exposure of microfibers to copepods was designed by applying conditions [...] Read more.
We investigated the probability of copepod entanglement in microfibers in a laboratory experiment. This experiment was inspired by an accidental observation of entangled copepods with microfibers during isolating copepods for grazing experiments. The exposure of microfibers to copepods was designed by applying conditions similar to environmentally relevant concentrations of microfibers to zooplankton in the Yellow Sea as well as highly elevated concentrations of microfibers compared to the previously reported maximum natural concentration. Copepod entanglement in microfibers was reproduced in laboratory. The entanglement was not observed in the condition which simulated the environmental scenario of copepods outnumbering microfibers observed in the Yellow Sea, while it occurred inconsistently in the conditions of the maximum and 10-fold maximum natural concentrations of microfibers. However, consistent entanglement of copepods by microfibers was found in the 100-fold maximum environmental concentration of microfibers. These results suggest that copepod entanglement by microfibers can happen accidentally under the maximum natural concentration of microfibers occurring in the marine environment; however, copepods are likely to be entangled in microfibers consistently if copepods encounter highly enhanced concentration of microfibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Terrestrial Microplastics in Soil and Water)
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