Special Issue "Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Zhongbing Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Department of Applied Ecology
Interests: water quality; environmental impact assessment; environment; ecosystem ecology; water treatment; biodiversity; wastewater treatment; ecology; water analysis; water and wastewater treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the early 1950s, the first experiments on the use of wetland plants to treat wastewater were carried out by Dr. Käthe Seidel in Germany. The first full-scale constructed wetlands (CW) were put into operation in the Netherlands in 1967. After slowly spreading in the 1970s and 1980s, CWs became international in the 1990s with more and more interaction among scientists and engineers all over the world, and they have continued to grow in popularity since. Currently, CWs are recognized as a reliable wastewater treatment technology and represent a suitable solution for the treatment of many types of wastewater, such as domestic wastewater, stormwater, agricultural drainage, industry effluent, landfill leachate, activated sludge, and so on. They have been considered a cost-efficient nature-based technology for the removal of traditional pollutants (COD, BOD, nitrogen, phosphorus) with various types. Additionally, CWs are flexible and can be easily adapted to new applications, including the removal of contaminants of emerging concern.

This Special Issue will become a platform for the exchange of experiences and valuable observations of researchers in the field of constructed wetlands research. It will concentrate on highlighting timely research studies addressing the removal of various pollutants in CWs. This Special Issue welcomes submissions covering a broad range of topics related to CW applications for water and wastewater purification, bringing new insights into the treatment performance of different pollutants as well as their removal mechanisms in CWs. Review papers, research papers, and case studies are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Zhongbing Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Constructed wetlands
  • Floating treatment wetlands
  • Sludge treatment wetland
  • Wastewater treatment
  • Pollutants’ removal
  • Heavy metals
  • Contaminants of emerging concern

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Bioaugmentation-Enhanced Remediation of Crude Oil Polluted Water in Pilot-Scale Floating Treatment Wetlands
Water 2021, 13(20), 2882; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202882 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 307
Abstract
Floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) are cost-effective systems for the remediation of polluted water. In FTWs, the metabolic activity of microorganisms associated with plants is fundamental to treatment efficiency. Bioaugmentation, the addition of microorganisms with pollutant-degrading capabilities, appears to be a promising means to [...] Read more.
Floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) are cost-effective systems for the remediation of polluted water. In FTWs, the metabolic activity of microorganisms associated with plants is fundamental to treatment efficiency. Bioaugmentation, the addition of microorganisms with pollutant-degrading capabilities, appears to be a promising means to enhance the treatment efficiency of FTWs. Here, we quantified the effect of bioaugmentation with a four-membered bacterial consortium on the remediation of water contaminated with crude oil in pilot-scale FTWs planted with Phragmites australis or Typha domingensis. The bacteria had been isolated from the endosphere and rhizosphere of various plants and carry the alkane hydroxylase gene, alkB, involved in aerobic hydrocarbon degradation. During a treatment period of 36 days, FTWs planted with P. australis achieved a reduction in hydrocarbon concentration from 300 mg/L to 16 mg/L with and 56 mg/L without bioaugmentation. In the FTWs planted with T. domingensis, respective hydrocarbon concentrations were 46 mg/L and 84 mg/L. The inoculated bacteria proliferated in the rhizoplane and in the plant interior. Copy numbers of the alkB gene and its mRNA increased over time in plant-associated samples, suggesting increased bacterial hydrocarbon degradation. The results show that bioaugmentation improved the treatment of oil-contaminated water in FTWs by at least a factor of two, indicating that the performance of full-scale systems can be improved at only small costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands)
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Article
Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration on Phragmites australis and Wastewater Treatment Efficiency in Constructed Wetlands
Water 2021, 13(18), 2500; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13182500 - 12 Sep 2021
Viewed by 658
Abstract
Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) has been predicted to rise to more than 400 ppm by the end of this century. It has received extensive attention with regard to the pros and cons of e[CO2] [...] Read more.
Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) has been predicted to rise to more than 400 ppm by the end of this century. It has received extensive attention with regard to the pros and cons of e[CO2] effects in terrestrial and marine ecosystems, while the effects of e[CO2] on wastewater treatment efficiency in constructed wetlands (CWs) are rarely known. In this study, the atmospheric CO2 concentration was set as 400 ppm (that is, ambient [CO2]) and 800 ppm (that is, e[CO2]). The physiological performance of Phragmites australis and microbial enzyme activities in constructed wetlands in response to e[CO2] were tested. Significantly higher net photosynthetic rate and plant growth were found under e[CO2]. The concentrations of nitrate, total anions, and total ions in the xylem sap of Phragmites australis were reduced, while the uptake of N and P in plants were not affected under e[CO2] condition. In addition, the ammonia monooxygenase activity was reduced, while the phosphatase activity was enhanced by e[CO2]. The increased removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen in CWs could be ascribed to the changes in physiological performance of Phragmites australis and activities of microbial enzymes under e[CO2]. These results suggested that the future atmospheric CO2 concentration could affect the wastewater treatment efficiency in CWs, due to the direct effects on plants and microorganisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands)
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Article
Wastewater Treatment and Wood Production of Willow System in Cold Climate
Water 2021, 13(12), 1630; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121630 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 759
Abstract
This article studied how wastewater treatment performance of a short rotation forestry system was influenced by the seasonal operational changes under the extreme Mongolian winter conditions. For this reason, two beds planted with Willow (Salix spec.) and Poplar (Populus spec.) trees [...] Read more.
This article studied how wastewater treatment performance of a short rotation forestry system was influenced by the seasonal operational changes under the extreme Mongolian winter conditions. For this reason, two beds planted with Willow (Salix spec.) and Poplar (Populus spec.) trees were operated over a period of two years under two different seasonal conditions: (A) “external winter storage” and (B) “internal winter storage” of pretreated wastewater. For operational condition A, the tree-bed was loaded with wastewater for only 4 summer months. For this operational condition it was considered that the treatment bed was fed with primary treated wastewater, which was stored in a sealed pond during the remaining 8 months. The other Bed B was irrigated throughout the year (12 months) with the same daily loading rate. In winter, the wastewater accumulated as ice in the tree-bed. Bed A, with external winter storage, showed mass removal percentage up to 95%, while the bed with internal winter storage showed mass removal rates up to 86% for pollutants such as COD, BOD5, TN, and TP. A high yield of biomass was recorded for both beds with slight differences. Based on the results, a design recommendation was developed for full-scale systems of short rotation coppice irrigated with wastewater under various operational conditions, which show these systems to be a viable method for treating wastewater and producing biomass for energy production in Mongolia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands)
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Review

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Review
Using Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids to Enhance Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives
Water 2021, 13(4), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040446 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 806
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), an organic pollutant with persistence and carcinogenicity, are universally present in the environment and food processing. Biological approaches toward remediating PAHs-contaminated sites are a viable, economical, and environmentally friendly alternative compared to conventional physical and/or chemical remediation methods. Recently, [...] Read more.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), an organic pollutant with persistence and carcinogenicity, are universally present in the environment and food processing. Biological approaches toward remediating PAHs-contaminated sites are a viable, economical, and environmentally friendly alternative compared to conventional physical and/or chemical remediation methods. Recently, various strategies relating to low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) have been developed to enhance the microbial degradation of PAHs. However, the remaining challenge is to reveal the role of LMWOAs in the PAHs biodegradation process, and the latter limits researchers from expanding the application scope of biodegradation. In this mini-review, we summarized the current understanding of the impact of LMWOAs on (1) the physicochemical behavior of PAHs in the extracellular environment; (2) the interactions between PAHs and the microbial cell surface; and (3) the intracellular metabolization of PAHs. Future perspectives for this field are discussed in this review as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands)
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