Special Issue "Ocean Wave Interaction with Ice Cover and Other Flexible and Porous Structures"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yury Stepanyants
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Sciences, Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
Interests: physical oceanography; fluid mechanics; nonlinear wave theory
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mike Meylan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
Interests: wave interactions with sea ice and ice sheets; complex scattering problems; generalized eigenfunction and spectral method
Prof. Trilochan Sahoo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
Interests: wave-structure interaction problems; coastal hydrodynamics and hydroelasticity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting you to contribute to this Special Issue of the journal Water. The Issue will be devoted to the ocean wave interaction with ice covers, including sea ice and ice sheets, and other flexible and porous structures, including porous or flexible ocean beds that have bottom undulations. It will be an excellent opportunity to report research in the specific field of oceanic wave interaction with various natural and engineering structures, as well as with currents, water stratification, and turbulence. Engineering structures of interest include coastal and offshore structures such as breakwaters, trenches, floating bridges, subsurface pipelines, ships, and very large floating platforms. Both linear and non-linear phenomena in the broad area of wave-structure interaction problems can be presented; theoretical, numerical, and experimental results are very welcome. Both research and review papers are welcome for possible publication in this Special Issue.

Prof. Yury Stepanyants
Assoc. Prof.  Mike Meylan
Prof. Trilochan Sahoo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • flexural-gravity waves
  • ice-covered ocean
  • porous structures
  • compressed ice
  • moving source

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Mitigation of Hydroelastic Responses in a Very Large Floating Structure by a Connected Vertical Porous Flexible Barrier
Water 2022, 14(3), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14030294 - 19 Jan 2022
Viewed by 123
Abstract
The hydroelastic response of an elastic thin plate combined with a vertical porous flexible plate floating on a single- or a two-layer fluid is analyzed in the two-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The vertical and the horizontal plates are placed in an inverted-L shape [...] Read more.
The hydroelastic response of an elastic thin plate combined with a vertical porous flexible plate floating on a single- or a two-layer fluid is analyzed in the two-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The vertical and the horizontal plates are placed in an inverted-L shape and rigidly connected together. The problem is studied with the aid of the method of matched eigenfunction expansions within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible, and the motion is assumed to be irrotational. Time–harmonic incident waves of the traveling mode with a given angular frequency are considered. Then, the least-squares approximation method and the inner product are used to obtain the expansion coefficients of the velocity potentials. Graphical results show the interaction between the water waves and the structure. The effects of several physical parameters, including the length and the complex porous-effect parameter of the vertical plate, on the wave reflection and transmission are discussed. The results show that a vertical plate can effectively eliminate the hydroelastic response of the very large floating structure. The longer a vertical plate is, the more waves are reflected by the vertical plate. With the increase in the porous-effect parameter, the deflection of vertical plate decreases. Besides the effects of the flexural rigidity, the lateral stress, the mooring line angle, the fluid density ratio, and the position of interface on the wave reflection and transmission are discussed. Numerical results show the significant mitigation effect due to the presence of the additional vertical plate. Full article
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Article
Hydroelastic Waves in a Frozen Channel with Non-Uniform Thickness of Ice
Water 2022, 14(3), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14030281 - 18 Jan 2022
Viewed by 110
Abstract
The periodic flexural-gravity waves propagating along a frozen channel are investigated. The channel has a rectangular cross section. The fluid in the channel is inviscid, incompressible and covered with ice. The ice is modeled by a thin elastic plate whose thickness varies linearly. [...] Read more.
The periodic flexural-gravity waves propagating along a frozen channel are investigated. The channel has a rectangular cross section. The fluid in the channel is inviscid, incompressible and covered with ice. The ice is modeled by a thin elastic plate whose thickness varies linearly. Two cases have been considered: the ice thickness varies symmetrically across the channel, being the smallest at the center of the channel and the largest at the channel walls; the ice thickness varies from the smallest value at the one wall to the largest value at another wall. The periodic 2D problem is reduced to the problem of the wave profiles across the channel. The solution of the last problem is obtained by the normal mode method of an elastic beam with linear thickness. The behavior of flexural-gravity waves depending on the inclination parameter of the ice thickness has been studied and the results have been compared with those for a constant-thickness plate. Dispersion relations, profiles of flexural-gravity waves across the channel and distributions of strain in the ice cover have been determined. In the asymmetric case, it is shown that for long waves, the most probable plate failure corresponds to transverse strains at the thin edge of the plate, which can lead to detachment of the ice from the corresponding bank. For short waves, the longitudinal stresses within the plate, localized closer to the thick edge, become maximum. This can lead to cracking of the plate in transverse direction. In the symmetric case, the maximum strains are achieved inside the plate—close to the center, but not necessarily in the midpoint. Full article
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Article
Bragg Scattering of Surface Gravity Waves Due to Multiple Bottom Undulations and a Semi-Infinite Floating Flexible Structure
Water 2021, 13(17), 2349; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172349 - 27 Aug 2021
Viewed by 686
Abstract
Surface gravity wave interaction with a semi-infinite floating elastic plate in the presence of multiple undulations has been studied under the assumption of linearized water wave theory and small amplitude structural response. The elastic plate is modeled using the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation, whilst [...] Read more.
Surface gravity wave interaction with a semi-infinite floating elastic plate in the presence of multiple undulations has been studied under the assumption of linearized water wave theory and small amplitude structural response. The elastic plate is modeled using the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation, whilst the multiple undulations are categorized as an array of submerged trenches or breakwaters. The numerical solution obtained in finite water depth using the boundary element method is validated with the semi-analytic solution obtained under shallow water approximation. Bragg resonance occurs due to the scattering of surface waves by an array of trenches or breakwaters irrespective of the presence of the floating semi-infinite plate. The zero-minima in wave reflection occur when the width of the trench and breakwater is an integer multiple of 0.6 and 0.35 times wavelength, respectively, as the number of trenches or breakwaters increases. In contrast to trenches and breakwaters in isolation, non-zero minima in wave reflection occur in the presence of a semi-infinite plate. Moreover, the number of complete cycles in trenches is less than the number of complete cycles in breakwaters, irrespective of the presence of the floating structure. The frequency of occurrence of zero minimum in wave reflection is reduced in the presence of the semi-infinite plate, and wave reflection increases with an increase in rigidity of the floating plate. Time-dependent simulation of free surface displacement and plate deflection due to multiple undulations of seabed in the presence of the semi-infinite floating plate is demonstrated in different cases. Full article
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Article
Hydrodynamic Forces Exerting on an Oscillating Cylinder under Translational Motion in Water Covered by Compressed Ice
Water 2021, 13(6), 822; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060822 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 557
Abstract
This paper presents the calculation of the hydrodynamic forces exerted on an oscillating circular cylinder when it moves perpendicular to its axis in infinitely deep water covered by compressed ice. The cylinder can oscillate both horizontally and vertically in the course of its [...] Read more.
This paper presents the calculation of the hydrodynamic forces exerted on an oscillating circular cylinder when it moves perpendicular to its axis in infinitely deep water covered by compressed ice. The cylinder can oscillate both horizontally and vertically in the course of its translational motion. In the linear approximation, a solution is found for the steady wave motion generated by the cylinder within the hydrodynamic set of equations for the incompressible ideal fluid. It is shown that, depending on the rate of ice compression, both normal and anomalous dispersion can occur in the system. In the latter case, the group velocity can be opposite to the phase velocity in a certain range of wavenumbers. The dependences of the hydrodynamic loads exerted on the cylinder (the added mass, damping coefficients, wave resistance and lift force) on the translational velocity and frequency of oscillation were studied. It was shown that there is a possibility of the appearance of negative values for the damping coefficients at the relatively big cylinder velocity; then, the wave resistance decreases with the increase in cylinder velocity. The theoretical results were underpinned by the numerical calculations for the real parameters of ice and cylinder motion. Full article
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