Special Issue "Flow, Heat and Biogeochemical Transport in Coupled Surface Water-Vadose Zone-Groundwater System"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hongbin Zhan
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Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, USA
Interests: groundwater hydrology; flow and transport in geological formations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Kewei Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, China
Interests: coupled flow, heat and reactive transport modeling; ensemble data assimilation; microbially mediated reaction
Dr. Yang Xian
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Guest Editor
School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), China
Interests: surface water and groundwater interaction; coupled flow, biogeochemical transport and microbial growth modelling
Dr. Chong Ma
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Mathematics and Physics, China University of Geosciences,Wuhan, China
Interests: saturated–unsaturated flow; groundwater hydrology; multiple-layer flow

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface water vadose zone–groundwater system is a coupled system in which water flow, heat transport and biogeochemical activity are tightly linked with each other. Heat and biogeochemical transport may exhibit distinctly different responses to the hydrological events (e.g, precipitation, flooding) at different scales (e.g, river sediment, riparian zone, catchment). However, to what extent hydrologic flow can affect the transport behavior across multiple spatiotemporal scales, such as from days to decades and from shallow soil to deep aquifer, still remain to be solved. The objective of this Special Issue was to state the recent advances in this interdisciplinary area. The topics may include, but are not limited to, integrated hydrologic modeling, multiphase flow and transport across unsaturated zones and saturated zones, heat transport and energy redistribution under hydrologic events, biogeochemical transport from shallow soil to deep groundwater. Both modeling and field work are of great value to deepen our understanding of the coupled system. We encourage researchers with different backgrounds (e.g., hydrologists, ecologists, geochemists) to contribute original data, innovative field monitoring technology and advanced modeling methods to this Special Issue. Review articles focused on one or more related topics are also highly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Hongbin Zhan
Dr. Kewei Chen
Dr. Yang Xian
Dr. Chong Ma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coupled flow and heat transport
  • biogeochemical transport
  • surface water–groundwater interaction
  • multiphase flow
  • integrated hydrologic modeling
  • hydrologic events

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Development Trend and Research Frontiers of Distributed Hydrological Models—Visual Bibliometric Analysis Based on Citespace
Water 2021, 13(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020174 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 737
Abstract
Based on the bibliometric and data visualization analysis software Citespace, this study carried out document statistics and information mining on the Web of Science database and characterized the distributed hydrological model knowledge system from 1986 to 2019. The results show a few things: [...] Read more.
Based on the bibliometric and data visualization analysis software Citespace, this study carried out document statistics and information mining on the Web of Science database and characterized the distributed hydrological model knowledge system from 1986 to 2019. The results show a few things: (1) from 1986 to 2019, the United States and China accounted for 41% of the total amount of publications, and they were the main force in the field of distributed hydrological model research; (2) field research involves multiple disciplines, mainly covering water resources, geology, earth sciences, environmental sciences, ecology and engineering; (3) the frontier of field research has shifted from using distributed hydrological models in order to simulate runoff and nonpoint source environmental responses to the coupling of technologies and products that can obtain high-precision, high-resolution data with distributed hydrological models. (4) Affected by climate warming, the melting of glaciers has accelerated, and the spatial distribution of permafrost and water resources have changed, which has caused a non-negligible impact on the hydrological process. Therefore, the development of distributed hydrological models suitable for alpine regions and the response of hydrological processes to climate change have also become important research directions at present. Full article
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Article
How Elevated CO2 Shifts Root Water Uptake Pattern of Crop? Lessons from Climate Chamber Experiments and Isotopic Tracing Technique
Water 2020, 12(11), 3194; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113194 - 15 Nov 2020
Viewed by 516
Abstract
Root water uptake plays an important role in water transport and carbon cycle among Groundwater–Soil–Plant–Atmosphere–Continuum. The acclimation of crops under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (eCO2) depends greatly on their capability to exploit soil water resources. Quantifying root water uptake and its [...] Read more.
Root water uptake plays an important role in water transport and carbon cycle among Groundwater–Soil–Plant–Atmosphere–Continuum. The acclimation of crops under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (eCO2) depends greatly on their capability to exploit soil water resources. Quantifying root water uptake and its relationship with crop growth under eCO2 remains challenging. This study observed maize growth subjected to current CO2 (400 ppm) and eCO2 (700 ppm) treatments via a device combined with a climate chamber and weighing lysimeters. Root water uptake patterns were determined based on the isotopic tracing technique. The main water uptake depth shifted from 0−20 cm under current treatment to 20−40 cm under eCO2 at the seedling growth stage. Maize took up 22.7% and 15.4% more soil water from a main uptake depth of 40−80 cm at jointing and tasseling stages in response to eCO2, respectively. More soil water (8.0%) was absorbed from the 80−140 cm layer at the filling stage under eCO2. Soil water contributions at the main uptake depth during seedling stage were negatively associated with leaf transpiration rate (Tr), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and leaf area index (LAI) under both treatments, whereas significant positive correlations in the 40−80 cm layer under current treatment shifted to the 80−140 cm layer by eCO2. Deep soil water benefited to improve Tr, Pn and LAI under both treatments. No significant correlation between soil water contributions in each layer and leaf water use efficiency was induced by eCO2. This study enhanced our knowledge of crop water use acclimation to future eCO2 and provides insights into agricultural water management. Full article
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