Special Issue "Process Based Modelling of Natural and Distributed Flood Control Measures"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Markus Disse
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Guest Editor
Technical University of Munich (TUM)Faculty of Civil, Geo and Environmental EngineeringChair of Hydrology and River Basin Management,80333 Munich, Germany
Interests: Hydrology, Water Resources Management, Flood Modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to submit your latest research findings showing progress in the ‘’Process-Based Modelling of Natural and Distributed Flood Control Measures’’ to a Special Issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441), an open-access journal (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/water).

Nature-based retention measures are an essential part of a sustainable and integrated flood-protection strategy at different scales. Natural and distributed flood control measures comprise land-use change; agricultural management; the restoration of rivers and floodplains; as well as small, uncontrolled retention basins.

It is essential to analyze the effects of these measures. Different modelling approaches in different catchments impede the comparability of many research projects. For this reason, the effectiveness of these measures is often controversially discussed.

Channel restorations such as flow path extension, channel widening, or uplifting the channel bottom have been effectively used and implemented. Coupled with flood plain measures, retention and translation effects have to be quantified. One aim of this Special Issue is to bring together recent research on the effects of combined river and flood plain restoration in different catchments with various topographic properties and different spatial scales. Moreover, submissions analyzing the impact of different land-use, agricultural management, and small retention basins on runoff generation and runoff concentration are encouraged.

We especially welcome submissions about modelling results, as well as experimental outcomes that anlyse catchment and event characteristics with regard to their flood reduction potential. Manuscripts about optimizing nature-based solutions for flood risk reduction in mesoscale catchments are also welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Markus Disse
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural and distributed flood control
  • Land use change
  • Agricultural management
  • River restoration
  • Floodplain restoration
  • Small retention basins
  • Process-based modelling
  • Experimental outcomes.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Automated Location Detection of Retention and Detention Basins for Water Management
Water 2020, 12(5), 1491; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051491 - 23 May 2020
Abstract
Retention and detention basins are engineering constructions with multiple objectives; e.g., flood protection and irrigation. Their performance is highly location-dependent, and thus, optimization strategies are needed. LOCASIN (Location detection of retention and detention basins) is an open-source MATLAB tool that enables automated and [...] Read more.
Retention and detention basins are engineering constructions with multiple objectives; e.g., flood protection and irrigation. Their performance is highly location-dependent, and thus, optimization strategies are needed. LOCASIN (Location detection of retention and detention basins) is an open-source MATLAB tool that enables automated and rapid detection, characterization and evaluation of basin locations. The site detection is based on a numerical raster analysis to determine the optimal dam axis orientation, the dam geometry and the basin area and volume. After selecting a reasonable basin combination, the results are summarized and visualized. LOCASIN represents a user-friendly and flexible tool for policy makers, engineers and scientists to determine dam and basin properties of optimized positions for planning and research purposes. It can be applied in an automated way to solve small and large scale engineering problems. The software is available on GitHub. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Bottom-Up Assessment of Climate Risk and the Robustness of Proposed Flood Management Strategies in the American River, CA
Water 2020, 12(3), 907; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030907 - 23 Mar 2020
Abstract
The hydrologic nonstationarity and uncertainty associated with climate change requires new decision-making methods to incorporate climate change impacts into flood frequency and flood risk analyses. To aid decision-making under climate change, we developed a bottom-up approach for assessing the performance of flood management [...] Read more.
The hydrologic nonstationarity and uncertainty associated with climate change requires new decision-making methods to incorporate climate change impacts into flood frequency and flood risk analyses. To aid decision-making under climate change, we developed a bottom-up approach for assessing the performance of flood management systems under climate uncertainty and nonstationarity. The developed bottom-up approach was applied to the American River, CA, USA flood management system by first identifying the sensitivity and vulnerability of the system to different climates. To do this, we developed a climate response surface by calculating and plotting Expected Annual Damages (EAD, $/year) under different flood regimes. Next, we determined a range of plausible future climate change and flood frequency scenarios by applying Bayesian statistical methods to projected future flows derived from a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model forced with Global Circulation Model (GCM) output. We measured system robustness as the portion of plausible future scenarios under which the current flood system could meet its performance goal. Using this approach, we then evaluated the robustness of four proposed management strategies in the 2012 Central Valley Flood Protection Plan in terms of both flood risk and cost-effectiveness, to assess the performance of the strategies in the face of climate risks. Results indicated that the high sensitivity of the expected damages to changes in flood regimes makes the system extremely vulnerable to a large portion of the plausible range of future flood conditions. The management strategy that includes a combination of nature-based flood management actions along with engineered structures yields the greatest potential to increase system robustness in terms of maintaining EAD below an acceptable risk threshold. However, this strategy still leaves the system vulnerable to a wide range of plausible future conditions. As flood frequency regimes increase in intensity from the current conditions, the cost-effectiveness of the management strategies increases, to a point, before decreasing. This bottom up analysis demonstrated a viable decision-making approach for water managers in the face of uncertain and changing future conditions. Neglecting to use such an approach and omitting climate considerations from water resource planning could lead to strategies that do not perform as expected or which actually lead to mal-adaptations, increasing vulnerability to climate change. Full article
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Hydraulic Modeling of Beaver Dams and Evaluation of Their Impacts on Flood Events
Water 2020, 12(1), 300; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12010300 - 19 Jan 2020
Abstract
There is a general agreement on the impact of beaver dams regarding the increasing diversity of habitats and the improvement of the water quality, whereas the retention effect during flood events is still being discussed. In this study, we modeled 12 beaver dam [...] Read more.
There is a general agreement on the impact of beaver dams regarding the increasing diversity of habitats and the improvement of the water quality, whereas the retention effect during flood events is still being discussed. In this study, we modeled 12 beaver dam cascade scenarios in two catchments for eight flood events with a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model. The implementation of the potential cascades in the model is based on the developed three-stage model for predicting location-dependent dam cascades in Bavaria. A Bavaria-wide questionnaire regarding dam occurrences and characteristics in combination with a detailed survey of 51 dams was used to set up a prediction scheme. It was observed that beaver dams are most likely built in rivers with riparian forest, with widths from 2 to 11 m and depths smaller than 1 m. The hydraulic model results showed larger inundation areas (>+300%) for the beaver dam scenarios. There is a noticeable peak attenuation and translation for elevated peak discharges (five times the annual mean discharge: up to ≤13.1% and 2.75 h), but no remarkable effect could be observed for flood events with return periods of more than 2 years. We conclude from the results that beaver dam cascades can have an impact on runoff characteristics, but do not lead to relevant peak reductions during flood events and therefore cannot be counted as flood mitigation measure. Full article
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