Earth Observations for Water Sciences: New Results from Remote, Proximity and Citizen-Driven Monitoring

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "New Sensors, New Technologies and Machine Learning in Water Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 September 2023) | Viewed by 4095

Special Issue Editors

National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), Tito Scalo, PZ, Italy
Interests: hydrology; flood hazard and risk; hydro-geomorphology; digital elevation models (DEM)-based analyses; soil erosion and loss; GIS; EO data integration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ, Italy
Interests: land cover dynamics; earth-surface/climate interactions; EO data for land cover monitoring and modelling; land degradation and desertification; time series analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Rosa Coluzzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ, Italy
Interests: GIS; image processing; remote sensing; EO data processing and integration; land cover and land use changes; spatial analysis; environmental mapping and monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Water Resources Research and Documentation Centre (WARREDOC), University for Foreigners of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: regional planning and sustainability; hazard and risk mapping and management; citizen science and public engagement; open geo data and big data; hydrology; natural hazards; GIS; geospatial data
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Water Resources Research and Documentation Centre (WARREDOC), University for Foreigners of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: hydrology; hydraulic modelling; data assimilation; hydro-geomorphic modelling; extreme events; terrain analysis; remote sensing; crowdsourcing; flood mapping; nature-based solutions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight advances and breakthroughs in the use of innovative data sources within the diverse fields of water research.

The current availability of free and ready-to-use satellite datasets offers a unique opportunity to monitor processes involved in hydrology and water resource management from the local to the global scale. Other remote sensing tools (e.g., airborne sensors, UAVs, etc.) are now able to provide detailed local scale information, while the use of networks of proximity sensors is replacing many traditional monitoring procedures, thereby enabling unprecedent observational continuity at different temporal scales. More recently, the development of citizen-driven monitoring tools promoted by mobile technology is fostering novel yet unstructured data, allowing unprecedented opportunities to use crowdfunding for the full-scale monitoring of complex urban and natural environments and for the validation of remote datasets.

We aim to collect contributions on the recent progress in the use of sensors and products that may be useful to hydrologists and geoscientists, especially in regions where traditional data are scarce. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following, with closely related topics also welcome:

  • monitoring of water-balance elements (e.g. precipitation, evaporation, evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge, water bodies storage, runoff, …);
  • monitoring of hydrological and hydraulic variables (e.g. soil moisture, water depth, flow velocity, river discharge, …);
  • hydraulic and hydroclimatic risk assessment and mitigation (e.g. floods and drought);
  • water quality and water resources management;
  • collection of data on surface waters (e.g. streams, lakes, marshes, …) and their characteristics (e.g. river channel width, depth, roughness, degree of tortuosity and braiding);
  • advanced approaches (e.g. artificial intelligence, machine learning, data assimilation) for the integration of multisensor/multiresolution data.
  • crowdsourcing and citizen science for integrating human sensor and behavioural mechanisms for improved knowledge, predictions and awareness in water resource and risk management.

We encourage authors to share their knowledge, experience, and achievements by submitting original research articles, reviews, recent advances, future trends and case studies.

Dr. Caterina Samela
Dr. Maria Lanfredi
Dr. Rosa Coluzzi
Prof. Dr. Fernando Nardi
Dr. Antonio Annis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • remote sensing
  • water monitoring
  • water balance
  • water quality
  • hydroclimatic risk
  • citizen science
  • crowdfunding
  • data integration
  • surface waters

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4680 KiB  
Article
Assessment and Comparison of Satellite-Based Rainfall Products: Validation by Hydrological Modeling Using ANN in a Semi-Arid Zone
Water 2023, 15(11), 1997; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15111997 - 24 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1525
Abstract
Several satellite precipitation estimates are becoming available globally, offering new possibilities for modeling water resources, especially in regions where data are scarce. This work provides the first validation of four satellite precipitation products, CHIRPS v2, Tamsat, Persiann CDR and TerraClimate data, in a [...] Read more.
Several satellite precipitation estimates are becoming available globally, offering new possibilities for modeling water resources, especially in regions where data are scarce. This work provides the first validation of four satellite precipitation products, CHIRPS v2, Tamsat, Persiann CDR and TerraClimate data, in a semi-arid region of Essaouira city (Morocco). The precipitation data from different satellites are first compared with the ground observations from 4 rain gauges measurement stations using the different comparison methods, namely: Pearson correlation coefficient (r), Bias, mean square error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient and mean absolute error (MAE). Secondly, a rainfall-runoff modeling for a basin of the study area (Ksob Basin S = 1483 km2) was carried out based on artificial neural networks type MLP (Multi Layers Perceptron). This model was -then used to evaluate the best satellite products for estimating the discharge. The results indicate that TerraClimate is the most appropriate product for estimating precipitation (R2 = 0.77 and 0.62 for the training and validation phase, respectively). By using this product in combination with hydrological modeling based on ANN (Artificial Neural Network) approach, the simulations of the monthly flow in the watershed were not very satisfactory. However, a clear improvement of the flow estimations occurred when the ESA-CCI (European Space Agency’s (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI)) soil moisture was added (training phase: R2 = 0.88, validation phase: R2 = 0.69 and Nash ≥ 92%). The results offer interesting prospects for modeling the water resources of the coastal zone watersheds with this data. Full article
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20 pages, 26463 KiB  
Article
Impact of Climate Change on Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Glaciers in Western Karakoram Region since 1990: A Case Study of Central Karakoram National Park
Water 2022, 14(19), 2968; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14192968 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1738
Abstract
Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) in Pakistan are the major source of water, irrigation, and power production for downstream regions. Global warming has induced a substantial impact on these glaciers. In the present study, Landsat images were utilized to evaluate the [...] Read more.
Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) in Pakistan are the major source of water, irrigation, and power production for downstream regions. Global warming has induced a substantial impact on these glaciers. In the present study, Landsat images were utilized to evaluate the glaciers for the period from 1990–2020 in the Central Karakoram National Park (CKNP) region to further correlate with climate parameters. The results reveal that glaciers are retreating and the highest (2.33 km2) and lowest (0.18 km2) recession rates were observed for Biafo and Khurdopin glaciers, respectively. However, a minor advancement has also been observed for the period from 1990–2001. More than 80% of glacier recession was recorded between 2009–2020 because mean summer temperature increased at both Skardu and Gilgit meteorological stations, while precipitation decreased at both stations from 2005–2020. The increase in mean summer temperature and decrease in winter precipitation resulted in glacial retreat, which will lead to water scarcity in the future as well as affect the agriculture sector and hydropower production in downstream areas of the Indus River basin. Full article
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