Special Issue "Dynamics and Biogeochemical Flows in Estuarine and Nearshore Systems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Erosion and Sediment Transport".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Miguel Ortega-Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Fluid Dynamics Group, Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada
Interests: coastal engineering; coastal morphology; sediment transport; wave processes; coastal management
Prof. Manuel Díez-Minguito
Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Fluid Dynamics Group, Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada
Interests: coastal physical oceanography; estuarine physics
Prof. Alejandro López-Ruiz
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of Seville
Interests: Coastal engineering; sediment transport; shoreline evolution; nearshore processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a urgent need of knowledge to understand the response of estuaries and nearshore systems to current and near-future challenges, such as natural and man-induced global changes. Sea level rise, increase in the probability of the occurrence of extreme events, increase in water temperature, reduction of run-off, and increase in human pressure on the ecosystems are just some examples of the changes that these coastal systems are facing. The sustainable management of estuaries and nearshore systems is therefore one of the greatest scientific and technical challenges of today. To tackle this challenge, it is required to have a precise knowledge of the dynamics and biogeochemical processes, and their interactions and modeling.

This Special Issue will contribute to obtain further insight into the hydrodynamic, sedimentary, and ecological processes in bays, marshes, estuaries, deltas, and different types of beaches. Manuscripts focusing on the (complex and idealized) modeling of hydrodynamics and biogeochemical flows and their interactions are welcome. Additionally, reviews identifying research priorities and showing recent advances in this field are invited.

Prof. Miguel Ortega-Sánchez
Prof. Manuel Díez-Minguito
Prof. Alejandro López-Ruiz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • estuaries
  • nearshore systems
  • coastal processes
  • tidal processes
  • field measurements
  • theoretical and numerical modeling
  • eco-morphodynamics
  • human impacts

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Natural and Human-Induced Flow and Sediment Transport within Tidal Creek Networks Influenced by Ocean-Bay Tides
Water 2019, 11(7), 1493; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071493 - 18 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Improving current understanding of hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics in complex tidal embayments is of major importance to face future challenges derived from climate change and increasing human pressure. This work deepens the knowledge of the hydro-morphodynamics of complex creek networks that connect basins [...] Read more.
Improving current understanding of hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics in complex tidal embayments is of major importance to face future challenges derived from climate change and increasing human pressure. This work deepens the knowledge of the hydro-morphodynamics of complex creek networks that connect basins with different characteristics, identifying their morphodynamic trends and the potential impacts of channel deepening. We selected two tidal creeks which flow through salt marshes and tidal flats of the Cádiz Bay (SW Spain) in a singular network due to their double connection to the Atlantic Ocean and the inner bay. We study the interactions between tidal waves that penetrate into the creeks from these two different bodies of water, analyzing the tidal asymmetry and the morphodynamic tendencies of the system. For the analysis, we set up a hydro-morphodynamic model specifically developed for areas with very shallow and complex channels. Results show that the tidal wave penetrates within the tidal network both from the inner Bay and the open ocean with different amplitudes, phases and flow velocities. There is also an asymmetric pattern for the tidal flows caused by the deformation of the dominant astronomical tidal constituents, M2 and M4, due to the non-linear interaction of tidal currents with the irregular creek geometry and bottom topography. Tidal asymmetry promotes the progressive infilling of the area where the tidal waves meet closing the connection between the open ocean and the inner bay, such an infilling trend being accelerated by human interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics and Biogeochemical Flows in Estuarine and Nearshore Systems)
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